How To Do Raised Leg Crunches Properly

The raised leg crunches fit the perfect description of a lower back-centred workout.

If you are out of options for a workout to strengthen your core, this crunch variation should be in your exercise routine.

As a result of the raised-leg crunch exercise, lower back strength and the complete core are more solid. Balance and mobility also improve.

Keeping your legs elevated increases stress and duration under tension on your abs. This stimulates more muscle fibres within your six-pack region.

  • Place your hands behind your head while you recline on your back.
  • Bend your knees to a 90-degree angle as you raise your legs high in the air.
  • Ensure your thighs are perpendicular to the floor.
  • Lift your shoulder blades off the floor and slowly raise your upper body toward your knees.
  • Hold the move for a few seconds while your abs are tight.
  • Slowly lower your body back to its starting position.
  • Do several repetitions of this move.

WHAT MUSCLES DO RAISED LEG CRUNCHES WORK?

Each of the exercises you choose to perform helps you ensure that you are exercising all of your muscle groups equally.

This minimizes the possibility of muscular imbalances leading to injury or an unnatural body shape. That said, here are muscles that raised leg crunches work.

RECTUS ABDOMINUS

This pair of muscles runs from your pelvis’ front to the ribs in the middle of your abdomen. They are popularly known as ‘six-pack’.

Moving your body is impossible without the muscles holding everything in place.

OBLIQUES

Your oblique muscles assist you to bend to the side and rotate your torso. Your lower back and posture also hold in place if your obliques are strong.

HIP

The hip muscles work together to maintain the pelvis and the thing structure. They support the lower body movement, which enables you to move around.

RAISED LEG CRUNCHES BENEFITS

A significant upside of the raised leg crunch is that it challenges your fitness zeal. And if you listen to the call, it gives you the following benefits.

STRENGTH

Raised leg crunch, when done correctly, assists in strengthening the upper abdominals. They are a recipe for the so much desired ‘six pack’.

STABILITY

As stated earlier, this exercise predominantly works the rectus abdominus, which holds your spine. It aligns it better, thereby giving your better stability and posture.

GREAT HOME WORKOUT

You can perform crunches at home as long as you have a comfortable surface to work on, such as a carpet or yoga mat. You don’t need special equipment or a personal trainer to do this simple core exercise.

PROMOTES WEIGHT LOSS

Training your abs calls for an intense workout, meaning you burn more calories. It helps trim your waist – visceral fat.

STRONGER CORE

Your core is at the heart of this exercise. Therefore, it develops a lot of muscle endurance from this workout.

ALTERNATIVES TO RAISED LEG CRUNCHES

The crunch is an integral part of core training. The exercise is on the to-do list for newbies hoping to build powerful abs.

Some start with raised leg crunches, while others jump to the variations below.

MEDICINE BALL LEG RAISE

Those looking for an intermediate and effective abdominal workout should try medicine ball leg lifts.

Technique:

  • To learn the movement correctly, use a little medicine ball at first.
  • Hold a medicine ball over your head while laying on an exercise mat and extending your arms and legs.
  • As you lift your feet to your hands, do a crunch upward with your arms straight.
  • Step backwards with your feet slightly elevated and with a medicine ball between your toes.
  • Slowly lower yourself back to the beginning position.
  • Grab the medicine ball from your feet and crunch back up.
  • Return to the starting posture by bringing your legs and upper body down.

SINGLE LEG RAISE

Your quadriceps and hip flexors gain a lot of strength from the single leg raise exercise.

Technique:

  • Tuck in your shoulders and your palms and face upwards.
  • Bend your knees slightly, and support your back.
  • Slide-out slightly the leg you want to raise.
  • Use this time to stretch your toes before continuing with the workout.
  • Do a few stretches at a time
  • Raise your leg while keeping your toes pointed to your nose.
  • Maintain a thigh-to-toe lift with your other leg.
  • Pause.
  • Ensure the raised leg doesn’t fall to the ground.

WEIGHTED LEG RAISES

Weighted leg raises work the abs and hip flexors, and quadriceps less effectively.

Technique:

  • Stack a dumbbell or a medicine ball between your two feet for a more challenging exercise.
  • Grab the pull-up bar with your hands and lift the weight with your feet.
  • Reverse the process by raising the leg to your midsection while keeping your legs straight.

RAISED LEG CRUNCHES MISTAKES TO AVOID

Form is crucial in every workout. But, raised leg crunches come with a fair share of mistakes as follows:

NOT STRETCHING

Before beginning any workout, make sure you stretch. The glutes and hamstrings should loosen up before the workout.

NOT ROLLING YOUR SHOULDER BLADES

Relax your neck and upper back muscles by rolling out your shoulders. Avoiding injury is easier if you’re flexible and loose.

Also, squeeze your abs even tighter by bringing your hips closer to your chest.

NOT BENDING YOUR KNEES

Bend your knees to alter the workout. Your core and lower back will thank you if you bend your knees 90 degrees instead of holding your legs vertically.

As you lift your arms towards your feet, keep your upper back straight.

DON’T TENSE YOUR CORE

Do not tense your neck; instead, engage your core. When doing crunches, many people mistake squeezing their necks during the upward action.

Crunch forward by squeezing your abs instead of pulling yourself up by flexing your biceps.

CONCLUSION

The raised leg crunches are an essential but ruthlessly effective workout. They frequently feel easy on the first repetition and then impossible by the tenth one.

Leg raises strengthen and stretch your hips and lower back and your lower ab. This is very beneficial for people who sit for long hours.