How To Do Deficit Reverse Lunge Properly

If your aim is to work these with a routine that is simple but effective, the deficit reverse lunge exercise could be your best option.

On the other hand, reverse lunges from a deficit are a whole new exciting turnaround to the reverse lunge.

With the overwhelming recognition the deficit reverse lunge is gaining, you definitely want to make in a staple in training.

This article tackles more than just why the deficit reverse lunge is good for you- it also highlights the common mistakes to look out for, the muscles that stand to benefit from it, effective alternatives and other interesting bits you might not want to miss.

HOW TO DO DEFICIT REVERSE LUNGE PROPERLY

First and foremost is to learn how to do this workout with the right form. Here is a step-by-step guide that will see you through.

Start with both your feet on a raised platform about hip width apart and dumbbells in both hands.

Take a step back with your right foot, lower yourself down until your right knee almost touches the ground.

Slowly come up out of the lunge and go back to the initial starting position with both of your feet on the platform. This is one complete rep. Repeat for the desired number of reps.

DEFICIT REVERSE LUNGE MUSCLES WORKED

The muscles that you will work with the deficit reverse lunge are almost similar to those of the forward lunge. The main target muscles are the quadriceps/ quads located at the front of your upper legs.

On the other hand, the muscles that help with the movement in this routine (synergist muscles) include: gluteal maximus, the adductor magnus found in your inner thighs and the soleus, located in your calves.

Additionally, your hamstrings in the back of your thighs and gastrocnemius in your calves will act as dynamic stabilizers. This mean that, while alongside stabilising your knee joint while on set, they also get strengthened.

In order to maintain your overall posture while doing the deficit reverse lunge, the following muscles work together: erector spinae, quadratus lumborum located in your lower back, gluteus medius and gluteus minimus.

However, the directly above-mentioned muscles will get worked at a lesser degree. This is because they are not involved in any significant movement of the deficit reverse lunge.

BENEFITS OF DEFICIT REVERSE LUNGE

COMPOUND EXERCISE

This exercise as a compound exercise means that it exercises numerous muscle groups in the body simultaneously.

LOSS OF WEIGHT

Since it blasts more calories, thanks to its compound nature, the exercise will in turn lead to weight loss.

AESTHETICS

This routine will help to sculp our that round butt you have always wanted, and enhance beautiful legs too!

IMPROVES BALANCE

Due to its unilateral characteristic, this exercise will activate your stabilising muscles, thus help you become more balanced and coordinated. This is because it will work each leg separately.

IMPROVES BODY ALIGNMENT

Since it works each leg separately, this routine will also address misalignments in your body and help to correct them. This will help to avoid overcompensating from your dominant side and eventually make you more symmetrical.

IMPROVES FLEXIBILITY AND MOBILITY

This exercise will increase your hip’s range of motion since it involves big movements. This will in turn make you more flexible and mobile.

STRNGTHENS YOUR CORE

This exercise will activate your core muscles which will eventually help to improve your posture and prevent injuries.

ALTERNATIVES TO DEFICIT REVERSE LUNGE

HAMSTRING CURLS

This alternative is a great isolation exercise that will allow your hips to remain in a stable and supported position, making it efficient if you are experiencing hip pains.

It is done on either a prone lying machine or a seated machine, depending on which one you are able to access.

LEG EXTENSION

This alternative is one of the best for your quads and serves to strengthen and tone the front of your thighs.

Like the hamstring curl, this routine will also allow your hips to remain in a supported and stable position, preventing painful movements at the joints.

CALF RAISES

Especially when done with the use of a raised platform/ step, the calf raise is a great way to strengthen your lower legs. This is crucial for supporting and balancing your body during lunge movements.

STIFF-LEG DEADLIFT

This alternative is a variant of deadlift exercise and will allow you to hit the entire posterior chain without necessarily having to move your knees.

CLAMSHELLS

This alternative is a hip external rotation exercise which will allow you to some of the most important muscles involved in performing a good deficit reverse lunge.

While at this, it will completely take the weight off your ankles.

GLUTE BRIDGES

This alternative is another effective bodyweight workout for the primary hip extensors (gluteus maximus)

The bridge position will take some load off your ankles and allow them to remain in a stable position throughout the routine.

SMITH MACHINE SQUAT

This alternative is a leg compound exercise that serves to engage all the major muscle groups of your leg simultaneously.

Additionally, it will allow your feet to remain stable, flat and avoid bending, which will help prevent injuries to your feet.

SINGLE LEG PRESS

If you leave the trailing foot out of the question, this alternative will resemble the deficit reverse lunge more closely. It is also a compound exercise and will hit more muscles simultaneously.

DEFICIT REVERSE LUNGE COMMON MISTAKES TO AVOID

CAVING IN YOUR FRONT KNEE

As you engage your knees in the deficit reverse lunge, it is required that you maintain your front knee inline with your toes. If your front knee caves inwards, you risk having flat feet.

HUNCHING OVER

Another common mistake while doing the deficit reverse lunge is hunching your upper body. This will lead to back pains and a bending body figure.

CONCLUSION

If you have loved this exercise and is planning on including it into your routine, be careful to maintain your balance and stay upright all through the workout because this is really the key.