How To Do T Bar Row Handle Properly

If you’re looking for an excellent exercise for your back, try the t bar row handle.

This workout is a variation of the t bar row exercise, which requires you to add a handle on the bar to help you with the lifting.

The handles allow you to lift more weight and add the benefits of holding the weights with a wide grip.

Working your back is essential for securing spine stability, improving posture and reducing the risk of pain and injuries. Also, a strong back helps you perform your daily activities with ease.

You don’t need to be a pro in weightlifting to perform the t bar row handle. You only need to start with the weight you can handle depending on your fitness level and increase it gradually as you become used to the exercise.

HOW TO DO T BAR ROW HANDLE PROPERLY

  • Put the bar into a landmine attachment or place it in a corner and add some weight on top to keep it stable. Load the bar with an appropriate weight onto your end.
  • Straddle the bar, and insert the t bar row handle next to the collar. Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and grip the handles, palms facing each other.
  • Hinge your hips and lift the bar off the ground. Bend your knees slightly and pull your chest up, keeping your back straight and shoulders. Also, extend your hands. This will be your starting position.
  • Pull the bar towards your upper abdomen. As you pull, squeeze your shoulder blades together as if you’re trying to pinch a pencil between them. Squeeze your core and the lower back muscles to help maintain abdominal tension throughout t bar row handle exercise.
  • Lower the bar to the starting position.
  • Repeat this motion until you’ve completed all reps that you set out for yourself.

WHICH MUSCLES DOES T BAR ROW HANDLE WORK

The t bar row handle primarily works your latissimus dorsi, rhomboids, and trapezius. It also targets your erector spinae, hamstring, core muscles and biceps.

LATISSIMUS DORSI

Known to many as “the lats,” this muscle makes up most of your back. The latissimus dorsi (lats) is a group of muscles that extend from the lower back, through the armpits, and down to the sides of your hips.

They help with arm motion and shoulder rotation and play an essential role in many daily activities, including lifting, reaching overhead, and even walking.

Strong lats help stabilize your spine, promote shoulder and arm strength, prevent back pain and reduce the risk of injuries.

RHOMBOIDS

Rhomboids are the muscles on either side of your spine, between your shoulder blades with a rhombus shape. They’re responsible for pulling your shoulders back and down.

These muscles are essential for stabilizing the shoulders. Working these muscles will help keep you from slouching, leading to a host of problems like rounded shoulders and poor posture.

A strong set of rhomboids also leads to increased upper body strength.

TRAPEZIUS

The trapezius is a large muscle that runs up the back of your neck and shoulders, connecting to your scapula at the top and your ribs at the bottom. It has three parts: the upper, middle and lower.

This muscle helps with head, neck, arms, shoulders and torso movements, which is essential for your daily activities.

Strong traps help improve balance, flexibility and coordination. It also helps to improve posture, relieves neck pain, and increases muscle mass and strength.

ERECTOR SPINAE

The erector spinae is a group of muscles that run the length of the back and are responsible for keeping your spine erect.

They also help you to stabilize your head and neck, as well as support your pelvis.

These muscles are vital to your overall health, as they help maintain the alignment of the vertebrae in your spine. They also help support the weight of your body and provide stability during movement.

It’s good to note that the t bar row exercise is a full-body workout that targets most of your muscles.

T BAR ROW HANDLE BENEFITS

INCREASES BACK STRENGTH

The t bar row handle exercise targets all of the major muscles in your upper body, especially your lats and traps. As a result, it helps strengthen the muscles making them more muscular.

A strong back helps stabilize your upper body, increase balance and improve posture. With a strong back, you’ll lift more weight during your everyday activities and workouts.

IMPROVE RANGE OF MOTION (ROM)

The ability to move your joints through their full range of motion is vital for everyday activities. Increasing range of motion help you move more efficiently, reducing energy consumption and increasing performance.

 

In addition, increased ROM also helps prevent injuries by ensuring that you can move through your full range without restriction.

IMPROVES MOTOR CONTROL

Motor control is the ability to perform a motor task with precision and accuracy. It requires good motor planning, which includes mental preparation and coordination of muscles.

 

The t bar row handle exercise requires you to control your movements when lifting and lowering the bar, which is excellent for your motor skills.

 

So, with excellent motor control skills, you can complete tasks more efficiently and effectively, thereby reducing the risk of injuries.

T BAR ROW HANDLE ALTERNATIVE

SEATED ROW CABLE ROWS

Seated cable rows are a great way to strengthen your back and arm muscles. You’ll need a cable machine for this exercise and an adjustable bench or seat.

  • Sit down on the bench with your feet planted firmly on the pads, knees bent slightly.
  • Grab the handle of the cable machine with both hands and pull it toward your chest, keeping your elbows bent throughout the exercise. Also, remember to keep your back straight and chest up throughout the entire movement.
  • Slowly release back to the starting position and repeat for 8-10 reps per set.

T BAR ROW HANDLE MISTAKES TO AVOID

KEEPING YOUR LEGS STRAIGHT

When you keep your legs straight during the t bar row handle exercise, you’re putting a lot of pressure on your lower back. This can cause injury or discomfort in the long term.

 

Instead, keep your knees bent and focus on squeezing your glutes as you lift the weight. This helps to maintain proper posture and keep your spine aligned to avoid injury.

USING MOMENTUM

When you use momentum during the t bar row handle exercise, you’re cheating yourself out of a good workout and putting your body at risk for injury. Instead of using momentum, use your lower body muscles and back to lift the weight up.

ROUNDING YOUR BACK

Don’t round your back when performing the t bar row handle exercise. Rounding your back can put unnecessary stress on your lower back muscles and spine. If done repeatedly over time, this could lead to injuries such as herniated discs or bulging discs.

 

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