How To Do T Bar Chest Press Properly

The t bar chest press is a great exercise to strengthen your pectoral muscles and build up overall strength in your upper body. This exercise is also known as the landmine chest press.

When done with proper form, it can help you lift more weight in other exercises like bench press, military press, and dips.

It’s a good exercise for beginners who are just starting with strength training, but it’s beneficial for experienced lifters.

To perform the t bar chest press properly, you’ll need to set up the equipment first. You will need a barbell, wedge it in a corner, or insert it on a landmine.

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HOW TO DO T BAR CHEST PRESS PROPERLY

  • Load the weight depending on your fitness level
  • Stand in front of the T bar/barbell with your feet shoulder-width apart, your knees slightly bent.
  • Lean forward slightly, and grip the end (your hand should overlap with palms facing each other). Hold the bar against your upper chest. This is the starting position.
  • Ensure your elbows are not flared out, flex your chest and keep your back straight.
  • Brace your core and glute, then inhale and press the bar overhand until your elbows are fully extended but not locked out. Hold there for a second.
  • Slowly lower the bar until it almost touches your chest. Exhale.
  • Repeat until you reach your desired reps.

You can also perform the t bar chest press when kneeling and even with one hand.

WHAT MUSCLES DOES T BAR CHEST PRESS WORK?

The t bar chest press targets the anterior deltoids, pectorals obliques, glutes, scapular stabilizers, triceps, and core muscles.

GLUTES

Glutes are the muscles of your butt. They’re also known as your “gluteal muscles.” And they’re pretty important—they not only help you walk and run, but they also help you jump, squat, and climb stairs.

Gluteal muscles include the gluteus maximus, the gluteus medius and the gluteus minimus.

SCAPULAR STABILIZERS

Scapular stabilizers are muscles that help keep your shoulders from rolling forward, which can cause back problems. They include the trapezius, rhomboids, serratus posterior superior and inferior, levator scapulae, and the rotator cuff muscles.

These muscles help keep your shoulder blades in a neutral position, so they don’t move too far apart when lifting something heavy or reaching over your head.

TRICEPS

The triceps are the three muscles at the back of your arm. They are the humerus, ulna, and scapula; they’re named for the three bones they attach to.

These muscles are responsible for extending your elbow joint and performing other movements that involve pushing or pulling with your arms.

Also, your triceps help you lift heavy objects during exercises and when performing your daily activities.

ANTERIOR DELTOIDS

The anterior deltoids are the most superficial of the three heads of the deltoid muscle. They’re also known as the front delts, located on the front of your shoulders.

The anterior deltoids are involved in many daily activities, such as lifting objects and pushing things away from you.

Anterior deltoids are also crucial for posture because they help keep your shoulders back and down when you’re standing up straight.

PECTORALS

The pectorals are the muscles that make up your chest.

It’s made up of two muscles: the pectoralis major and pectoralis minor. The pectoralis major is larger and thicker than its counterpart, but both are important for chest development.

The pecs work to bring your arms forward when you flex them (as if doing a push-up). The pectoralis minor pulls your shoulders down and back when you raise them.

OBLIQUES

The obliques are the muscles that run along your sides, from your ribs to your hips. They’re made up of the internal, external, and transverse abdominal muscles, which help stabilize your spine and aid in rotation.

They also help bend forward at the waist and protect your lower back from injury.

T BAR CHEST PRESS BENEFITS

IMPROVES PRESSING STRENGTH

Pressing strength is a vital component of athletic performance. The t bar chest press is an incredibly effective way to increase your pressing strength.

Pressing power is essential for exercises such as bench press, military press, and other activities that deal with pressing weights.

IT’S A PERFECT FUNCTIONAL EXERCISE

Functional exercises focus on the movements you use in everyday life and all the different activities that make up your life.

The t bar chest press helps build strength, balance, coordination, and flexibility, which are essential for performing daily tasks and getting around.

The t bar chest press helps you become stronger for daily activities such as putting something on the top shelf.

STABILIZES YOUR SHOULDERS

Stabilizing your shoulders helps keep them in place and allows them to move smoothly.

Weak shoulder muscles can cause pain in your neck and upper back, making it difficult to perform basic daily tasks like lifting groceries or holding a baby.

However, when you train these muscles, they become stronger and more flexible.

Stronger stabilizer muscles also allow for a greater range of motion so that when lifting heavy objects, there is less risk of injuring yourself.

IT HELPS IMPROVE MOTOR CONTROL

The t bar chest press requires excellent motor control and coordination, so it will help you develop both when you do it correctly. Good motor control helps improve movement accuracy, which is critical for assessing simple actions.

Furthermore, effective motor control aids in the development of endurance and strength required for exercises, sports, and other activities.

ALTERNATIVE TO T BAR CHEST PRESS

DUMBBELL CHEST PRESS

The dumbbell chest press is a great alternative to t bar chest press since its also a good upper-body workout. It will strengthen your chest, shoulders, triceps, and back muscles.

Steps:

  • Lie down on a bench with your feet flat on the floor. Hold a dumbbell in each hand, then extend your arms up.
  • Lower your arms until they’re just below your shoulders. Pause briefly at the bottom of the movement before pressing back up to the starting position again.

PUSH-UPS

Push-ups work out your upper body and lower body. They help tone your arms, chest, back, and core.

  • Get into a plank position with your hands directly under your shoulders.
  • Lower yourself into a push-up position by bending your elbows, keeping them close to your sides as you lower.
  • Push up with your arms and return to starting position.

T BAR CHEST PRESS MISTAKES TO AVOID

USING TOO MUCH WEIGHT

The t bar chest press requires a good form, so don’t try to lift more weight than what feels comfortable for your body.

You should be able to press the weight up without using momentum or swing your body forward for it to rise above your chest.

NOT PERFORMING THE FULL RANGE OF MOTION

When performing this exercise try to lower the bar until it touches your chest before pressing it back up again.

This will help improve muscle activation and prevent muscle imbalances from developing over time due to a lack of proper training stimulus from partial range reps.