How To Do Squat To Row Properly

Try the squat to row exercise if you’re looking for a full-body exercise that will target your arms, shoulders, and leg. It’s also known as the cable squat row or squat row. This is a workout that you can do in your home, even without a machine.

Doing a squat to row correctly is crucial for building upper body strength and improving your overall physique. Not only will you be engaging the lats and back muscles when making this move, but it will also challenge your core, hips, and legs.

You’ll need a cable machine to do this exercise. Let’s look at the steps to follow to do squat to row exercises properly.

HOW TO DO SQUAT TO ROW PROPERLY

  • Set up the cable to be at waist level. If you don’t have access to a cable machine, you can also use a resistance band, which you can do by anchoring it to a stable piece of furniture. Please make sure it’s got some slack in it.
  • Position yourself to face the cable machine and grab the handle(s).
  • Step back so that there’s some tension placed on the cable, and then pull your elbows back behind you and hold them there for five seconds. Only use one arm at a time if you need more stability or balance while doing this step.
  • Squat till your thighs are parallel to the floor or at 90 degrees(or as low as possible if this is too difficult), ensuring you keep your chest up and your core braced.
  • Push through your heels to come back up into a standing position

WHAT MUSCLE DO SQUAT TO ROW WORK

Squat to row workout involves two moves: the squat and the row. The squat uses the muscles of your legs (glutes, quads, hamstrings) and your core muscles (abs, obliques). Then the row uses the muscles of your shoulders and back (trapezius, rhomboids, latissimus dorsi). Primarily the squat to row works the lower back.

LATISSIMUS DORSI

The latissimus dorsi is a muscle in the middle of the back that runs from the lower spine to the upper arm. It’s one of the largest muscles in the body, and it’s responsible for extension, adduction, and transverse extension.

Rhomboids

The rhomboids are two small muscles that connect the shoulder blades to the spine, helping you pull your shoulder blades together. They’re also used when bending at the waist or raising your arms overhead.

OBLIQUES

The obliques are two muscles that run along each side of the torso, from just below the ribs to above the hips. They help you rotate your upper body and bend from side to side.

QUADRICEPS

Quadriceps is a group of four muscles at the front of your thighs. These are the muscles that are activated when you do a squat. They assist with straightening your legs and bending them at the knees. You use quadriceps, also known as “quads,” when jumping, kicking, squatting, walking, and cycling.

HAMSTRING

A hamstring is a group of three muscles at the back of your thighs; these muscles assist with flexing the knees. They also stabilize your upper body while you perform your daily activities.

GLUTEUS MAXIMUS

This is the largest muscle in your body, and it’s located at the back of your hips. It assists with extending your hips and legs and helps keep you upright when standing or sitting down. It also helps in shaping your butt.

TRAPEZIUS

The trapezius on either side of your neck extends down your spine to just above your shoulder blades. These upper back muscles extend from your neck outwards to each shoulder. They’re responsible for posture, allowing you to tilt and turn your head.

SQUAT TO ROW BENEFITS

1.      IMPROVED BALANCE AND STABILITY

The squat to row exercise helps you build core strength that keeps you balanced. This means less of an injury while walking, running or when performing other activities.

2.      BETTER BACK HEALTH

If you have a history of injuries to your back, the squat to row may be the answer. It strengthens your lower back and shoulders to avoid future injuries.

 

3.      HELPS STABILIZE YOUR HIP MUSCLES

If you’re looking for an exercise that targets both the front and back thigh muscles, the squat to row is it! This exercise will strengthen the adductor Magnus muscle in your thigh, responsible for knee stabilization when you walk and run. A strong adductor Magnus is essential for preventing injury during those activities.

  1. INCREASES ENDURANCE

The squat to row will help increase your endurance levels by strengthening all the major muscle groups in your body. For example, you’ll be able to run longer distances at a faster pace without getting tired as quickly.

ALTERNATIVES TO SQUAT TO ROW

Squat to row is a great exercise, but a little variety never hurts, right? Here are some alternatives to this exercise that you can try:

1.       SQUAT WITH SHOULDER PRESS

A squat with shoulder press is a core exercise that works your glutes, quads, hamstrings, and shoulders. It is also known as an overhead squat.

2.       DUMBBELL DEADLIFT

It strengthens your hamstrings, glutes, and lower back. Besides these key muscle groups, it also strengthens your calves and quadriceps. The exercise can help align your pelvis and spine, making it a great way to improve posture.

3.       SEATED BENT-OVER REAR DELT RAISE

The exercise targets your back and shoulders, helping you build a leaner, more symmetrical body.

This movement is perfect for those who want to improve their posture or even avoid injury.

SQUAT TO ROW MISTAKES TO AVOID

1.       USING MOMENTUM

Don’t use momentum when rowing up from the squat position. Practice slow, controlled movements instead of using speed to get through the move, which could cause an injury. This will help you feel the burn and tone your muscles more effectively than if you were moving through the motions with reckless abandon.

2.       NOT SQUEEZING YOUR SHOULDER BLADES

Don’t forget to squeeze your shoulder blades together at the top of your row. This may seem like a small detail, but it’s actually what makes this exercise great for strengthening your upper back muscles.

3.       NOT GOING LOW ENOUGH IN YOUR SQUAT

If you only go halfway down in your squat, you’re not working all the muscles that will help you tone your thighs. By squatting too shallow means you’re missing out on some great toning benefits. To fix this, try keeping your back straight and bending your knees as if you were sitting down in an invisible chair. At the bottom of the squat, your legs should make a 90-degree angle. Make sure to keep them bent as you stand up again.

4.       NOT DOING A COMPLETE ROW

If you only go halfway down in your rowing motion, you’re not working all the muscles that will help you tone up those arms and shoulders. Rowing too shallow will mean missing out on some great toning benefits. To fix this, try keeping your shoulders back and bending forward from the waist.