How To Do Heel Elevated Squats Properly

No squatting technique comes close to the leg-building power from heel elevated squats.

Although there are many ways to squat, the elevation in this technique has a lot of benefits for your legs’ strength.

This exercise is a sound strategy to build stronger and bigger legs. Your body executes squat exercises all day long, whether you are working out or sitting in a chair at home.

Nevertheless, it is essential to note that squats are a multi-joint and multi-muscle workout. Squats are a standard leg-day exercise, but mastering them safely and effectively requires practice.

Thus, these are the steps to complete the exercise in proper form.

  • Get your hands on a weighted plate, dumbbells, or a squat wedge.
  • Your heels should be on the plate, your feet somewhat wider than hip-width apart, and you should stand.
  • Maintain an erect stance and activate your core and glutes with control. Keep your weight evenly distributed on each foot and inhale, then exhale once more.
  • Keep your back straight as you begin to lower yourself into a squat position.
  • Reverse your hips as if you will sit on a chair, and hold that position.
  • Do your best to keep your hips lower than your knees, but don’t push it
  • Always remember to keep your torso level and your spine erect.

WHAT MUSCLE DO HEEL ELEVATED SQUATS WORK?

Squats are one of the most efficient lower-body exercises you can undertake. As a complex exercise involving several joints and multiple muscles, heel elevated squats are excellent for muscular growth.

That said, these are the muscles worked during this exercise.

QUADS

Your quadriceps will be impacted directly as a result of lifting your heels. Quadriceps are responsible for the raise since you have a broader range of motion in your knees.

One of the most underdeveloped muscles in the quadricep group is the vastus medialis, and this exercise targets it explicitly.

HAMSTRINGS

Your hamstrings, lower back, and buttocks are part of the posterior chain aiding in hip extension.

ABDUCTORS AND ADDUCTORS

Keeping your abductors and adductors engaged while squatting with your heels elevated keeps your hips in place.

They ensure that the knees withstand the pressure and do not sag.

GLUTES

The glutes and hamstrings work together when raising the heel.

OBLIQUE

Your obliques contract during the squat to keep your back straight. They help strengthen your core and improve your coordination and sense of equilibrium.

ERECTOR SPINAE

The erector spinae muscle helps you maintain a straight spine while squat and standing back up. It runs from your neck all the way up to your back.

RECTUS ABDOMINUS

When the rectus abdominis contracts, it keeps the erector spinae from causing your back to hyperextend.

HEEL ELEVATED SQUATS BENEFITS

There are several reasons why heel elevated squats are an excellent option for you.

BETTER SQUATTING DEPTH

A full range of motion squat is a challenge for many athletes at all levels, from beginners to advanced fitness personnel.

However, you increase the depth of your squat because your hamstring encircles your calves when you are in the bottom position.

This ensures that quadriceps, hamstring and gluteal muscles work to their full potential.

QUADRICEPS WORK MORE

Your quadriceps work harder than in a typical squat in the heel elevated squats.

When performing this workout, the vastus medialis is stretched to its limit and must work extra hard to keep the knee secure.

LESS LOWER BACK STRESS

Elevated squats have the added benefit of reducing strain on the lower back and lumbar spine.

ALTERNATIVES TO HEEL ELEVATED SQUATS

The following variations are as good as the original version of the squats. Here they are.

HEELS ELEVATED GOBLET SQUAT

This quad-centred exercise is also known as the bicycle squat; this quad-centred exercise, is a great way to get your thighs in peak shape.

Do these to complete it.

  • Put two bumper weight plates in the middle of the floor. You can see a long piece of wood instead.
  • Raise your heels – ensure the balls of your feet are on the ground.
  • Make sure to hold the weight plates (dumbbell or kettlebell) below your chin and in front of your chest
  • Brace your core by pulling your shoulders downward and backwards, and keep your body in place while maintaining a straight-ahead look.
  • Bend your knees and squat as far as you can without rounding your lower back.
  • Stand up, but don’t lock your knees. This will keep the stress on your muscles.
  • Repeat this for the number of times you need to.

SMITH MACHINE SQUAT

The Smith Machine allows you to extend your legs much more than you can with a standard squat.

This will keep you in place, especially if you are a novice. The smith machine prevents you from falling forward or backwards.

It tests your ability to do a full range of motion squat.

EMPTY BARBELL SQUAT

An empty barbell squat is an excellent variation of heel elevated squats. It helps you practice the motions of a workout.

It also helps in aligning the spine.

HEEL ELEVATED SQUATS MISTAKES TO AVOID

Squats are intense, and they require above average fitness. Therefore, these are the mistakes you should avoid.

EXERCISING WITH EXISTING KNEE PROBLEM

Heel elevated squats are more taxing on your knees than standard squats. There is too much pressure expended on the knees.

If your knees are in bad shape, you might have trouble doing this workout.

IMPROPER FORM

Performing a squat dictates proper, and the following techniques interfere with your form.

 

  • Forward bending around the hip
  • Failure to engage the core before getting down with the squat
  • Moving all the weight to the toes
  • Inner collapsing of the knees (knock knees)
  • Failing to squat low enough

If you miscalculate your moves from the beginning, the whole exercise takes improper form, making you prone to injury.

CONCLUSION

Heel elevated squats workout is a must-have addition to your training regiment. It has a lot of advantages over standard squats and is easy to master.