How To Do Hammer Strength High Row Properly

The hammer strength high row is an awesome exercise to build and tone your upper body. The workout targets your shoulders, lats, middle back, and biceps.

You will require a hammer machine to perform the exercise. The machine is iso-lateral in it has two loading points for weights and they can work independently or simultaneously.

If you are not sure how to operate your machine, consult your fitness trainer. Before commencing the exercise, ensure that the machine is in good condition.

Moreover, ensure that the handles on the lever are at the top part of the machine. Load the machine with weights that are in line with your endurance level.

How to do the hammer strength high row:

  • Start by grabbing the handles of the lever with an overhand grip while sitting down on the seat. As you sit, ensure that the knee pads lock your thighs in place. Place your feet firmly on the ground. Your chest and stomach area should rest against the upright pad of the machine. Ensure that your arms are fully extended. This is your starting position.
  • Pull the handles simultaneously. Do this while contracting your back muscles and bending your elbows to your sides. Do this in a slow and controlled motion.
  • Pause for a while then extend your arms to your starting position. This marks a complete rep.
  • Perform 10 to 15 repetitions for 4 sets.

WHAT MUSCLES DOES THE HAMMER STRENGTH HIGH ROW WORK?

LATISSIMUS DORSI MUSCLES

The hammer strength high row mainly targets your lats. The lats are large V-shaped muscles, which link your arms to your vertebral column.

The exercise grows and strengthens your lats, hence promoting back strength and spine stability. Moreover, you develop upper body strength, which is beneficial in daily life and gym activities.

SHOULDER MUSCLES

The exercise engages your shoulder blades, hence strengthening your shoulder muscles. This helps to prevent the occurrence of shoulder injuries. Strong shoulders also contribute to upper body strength.

MIDDLE BACK

The routine works your middle back muscles. This is because you contract your back while performing the technique. As a result, your posture improves and the risk of developing back pain reduces.

BICEPS

The exercise engages your biceps. While performing the hammer strength high row, your biceps assist in flexing your elbows.

TRAPEZIUS MUSCLE

The exercise engages your trapezius muscles. While performing the exercise, the trapezius muscles maintain the positioning of the scapula. A strong trapezius stabilizes your neck, upper back, and shoulders.

HAMMER STRENGTH HIGH ROW BENEFITS

CAN ALLOW UNILATERAL AND BILATERAL MOVEMENTS

The hammer strength high row is a great exercise since you can perform it in several variations and experience the same gains in your upper body.

For instance, you can pull the handles alternatively or simultaneously. This is very effective since it gives you choices as a beginner.

You can also mix up the patterns in your workout routine to help in breaking the monotony

SAFE EXERCISE  

If you are an elderly individual or your body is quite weak, you can still get active through performing this exercise. This is because you perform the exercise while you are seated. Moreover, the upright pad and knee pads secure your body in place. Therefore, you do not suffer from balance issues while performing the technique.

PROMOTES SERIOUS MUSCLE GROWTH AND STRENGTH

The workout promotes serious growth in your back and arm muscles. This is because you sit while performing it, hence you are able to work your back and arm muscles in isolation. Therefore, your muscles become stronger, which is beneficial to your daily life activities. You can lift and carry heavy objects with minimal strain.

ALTERNATIVES TO HAMMER STRENGTH HIGH ROW

KNEELING HIGH PULLEY ROW

The kneeling high pulley row is a great alternative since it works your lats. You will require a strength machine to perform this exercise.

How to do the kneeling high pulley row:

  • Select an appropriate weight that is in line with your endurance level. Ensure that the pulley is positioned above your head. Connect a strong rope to the cable.
  • While holding the rope with both hands, kneel a few feet away from the machine. This is your starting position.
  • Initiate the movement by fully retracting your shoulders and flexing your elbows. This will enable you to pull the rope towards your upper chest area.
  • Pause for a while then stretch your arms to the starting position.
  • Repeat 10 times for 3 sets.

PULL- UP

The pull-up strengthens your biceps and lats. You will need a secure overhead bar to perform this exercise.

How to do a pull-up:

  • Use a box or bench to reach the overhead bar. With your palms facing forward place your hands on the bar ensuring that they are shoulder-width apart.
  • Release your legs from the box and hang on the bar. Extend your arms fully, curve your back slightly, and keep your chest out. This is your starting position.
  • While exhaling, pull your body upwards until your chest is almost the same level as the bar.
  • Pause and lower yourself to the starting position in a slow and controlled motion. Do this while inhaling.
  • Perform 10 to 15 reps for 3 sets.

HAMMER STRENGTH HIGH ROW MISTAKES TO AVOID

FAILING TO ENGAGE YOUR BACK

A very common mistake while doing the hammer strength high row is pulling from the biceps. This prevents your shoulder girdle region from moving. Instead, engage your back while pulling the handles.

OVEREXTENDING THE HANDLES

Overextending the handles is counterproductive. This can strain your elbows and your back. Ensure that you extend the handles to your sides to maintain a neutral position.

CONCLUSION

The hammer strength high row is a great exercise to train your biceps and back muscles. Moreover, you can gain a lot of muscle mass.

You also develop upper body strength, stability, and good posture. The beauty of the exercise is that you can perform it in several variations.

Therefore, you are not limited to one technique. Consult your gym instructor if you experience any difficulties in performing the workout.