How To Do Dumbbell Stiff Leg Deadlift Properly

Being a beginner in the fitness game shouldn’t keep you from performing the dumbbell stiff leg deadlift.

This workout’s design powers up your back and legs as a compound exercise. The deadlift is well-known for developing powerful legs and a powerful back.

When done correctly, the dumbbell deadlift targets your traps, the muscles that go from your neck to your mid-back.

While many beginners keep off this workout out of fear that it is daunting, this article changes this perception.

Here is how you do it.

  • Hold two dumbbells at your sides.
  • Slightly bend your knees.
  • Keep shoulder-width distance while standing.
  • Keep your back straight while bending over at the waist to descend the dumbbells to your feet.
  • Place your knees in a straight line.
  • Drop the dumbbells to the ground.
  • Raise the dumbbells while engaging the hamstrings.
  • Have your shoulders back and your gaze pointing upwards.
  • Strike a straight-leg raise by squeezing your glutes and hamstrings.

WHAT MUSCLES DO DUMBBELL STIFF LEG DEADLIFT WORK?

The dumbbell stiff leg deadlift focuses on strengthening the back and legs. Therefore, these are the muscles it works.

HAMSTRINGS

The hamstrings sit at the rear of your thigh. They stretch from the hip to the knee joint, where tendons link them to the pelvis, lower leg, and knee.

These muscles aid in the flexion of the knee joint and the extension of the hip joint.

GLUTES

Your glutes work extensively during a deadlift to enable the abduction and external rotation of the knee.

LATS

Lats hold your back solidly when you lift your arms during the exercise.

CALVES

Your calf muscles shoulder all your weight when working out and aid upward and downward foot movement.

The following are other muscles that this deadlift training works to a smaller degree.

ADDUCTORS

They aid thigh adduction and stabilize the pelvis.

FOREARM FLEXORS

These muscles extend and flex your hand when working out.

DUMBBELL STIFF LEG DEADLIFT BENEFITS

There are several advantages of enduring the dumbbell stiff leg deadlift. They are:

SPINE STABILITY

One of the primary benefits is stabilizing the spine and ensuring there is adequate alignment. This prevents lower back pains and spine injury.

STRENGTH

In addition to generating more muscular legs, the deadlift is well-known for helping to develop a more powerful back. The dumbbell deadlift targets your traps when done correctly, a muscle group running from your neck down to your mid-back region.

Strengthening traps ensures the spine remains stable throughout the exercise.

IMPROVED MUSCLE COORDINATION

This variation is an excellent choice to target the hamstrings. This is a great way to work on tightening your hamstrings while deadlifting.

The barbell weight builds tension on your lower hamstrings, giving them more power.

BETTER ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE

Adding this exercise to your exercise routine can improve your athletic ability. It bolsters basic movements such as walking and running.

Essentially, it gives you explosive power.

ALTERNATIVES TO DUMBBELL STIFF LEG DEADLIFT

There is no harm in adding a dumbbell stiff leg deadlift to your routine. You can consider the following alternatives.

STIFF-LEGGED DEADLIFT

Be ready with an adjustable barbell and your weight plates.

How to do it:

  • Set the bar down on the floor to begin.
  • Nearly touch your shoelaces to a bar with your feet.
  • Take a hip-width position.
  • Grab the bar with your palms towards your body and lower your upper body by bending your hips backwards.
  • Throughout the action, maintain your knees slightly bent yet held in place.
  • Activate your core and hold your breath.
  • Lift the bar from the ground, keeping it close to your body at all times.
  • At all times, keep your back straight.
  • Take a deep breath and keep your head up high.
  • Slowly and carefully return the bar to the starting position.

GLUTE-HAM RAISE

The glute-ham raise is a posterior-chain workout targeting the hamstrings. But it’s not the easiest exercise to do.

How to do it:

  • Bend your knees 90 degrees so that your lower body is perpendicular to your lower legs.
  • Assume a cross-chest position with your arms folded.
  • Slowly lower your torso over the GHD’s edge until you attain a horizontal pose.
  • Keep your core tight
  • Contract your hamstrings.
  • Return to the beginning posture.

BULGARIAN SPLIT SQUAT

Compared to other lower-body compound motions, this exercise places more emphasis on the quadriceps.

How to do it:

  • Stand with your back against a strong bench.
  • Step forward with one foot, then elevate your back leg to lift your second foot onto the bench.
  • Keep your hips squared, your back straight, and your core tight while performing this exercise.
  • Slightly tilt your torso forward, then lower yourself until your knee almost touches the floor.
  • Always keep your glutes activated throughout the exercise.
  • Reverse the technique and push through your front heel to return to the starting position.
  • Complete at least three sets of 10-12 repetitions on the first leg.
  • Switch to the opposite leg.

DUMBBELL STIFF LEG DEADLIFT MISTAKES TO AVOID

Dumbbell stiff leg deadlift is hard enough to execute, but it gets even more complex with the following mistakes.

SKIRTING YOUR BACK

The most typical error when performing a dumbbell stiff leg deadlift is to round the back. It is critical to steady your body before any movement.

Pinch your shoulder blades together and strengthen your core before bending over at the waist to keep your back straight.

BEING TOO FAST

Some lifters usually do it too fast by bending over rapidly, which exposes them to injury.

DUMBBELLS AWAY FROM YOUR BODY

Allowing the dumbbells to be away from the body interferes with the technique. Your weight moves to your toes, putting additional strain on your back.

OVER-BENDING YOUR KNEES

Performing this exercise with your legs completely straight puts less stress on your knees. Performing it with your knees flexed to the fullest extent possible adds more stress.

CONCLUSION

Athletes of all levels should perform leg deadlifts as part of their training regimen. Moreover, those looking at working out as beginners can still perform this deadlift variation. For serious gym-goers, they too, can include this variation in their routine.