How To Do Chest Supported Rear Delt Fly Poperly

The chest supported rear delt fly is an exercise developed to achieve maximum efficiency. This is because it strives to eliminate all the common issues that derail efficiency when doing a regular delt fly.

WHAT TO DO:

  • Lie on a bench, chest facing down, with a dumbbell in each hand underneath your shoulders.
  • Slightly bend your elbows and raise your arms to the side until they’re in line with your body.
  • Lower the dumbbells to the floor and repeat.

WHAT MUSCLES DO THE CHEST SUPPORTED REAR DELT FLY WORK?

RHOMBOIDS

The rhomboids are two muscles that are located at a strategic place in order to work with the trapezius muscle.

This is especially so while doing the chest supported rear delt fly. The rhomboids are very useful when it comes to movements within the upper section of your arms and stability within the shoulder.

It is therefore engaged when you initiate movement of your arms – helping channel the required power to complete the exercise.

They thus provide balance within your shoulders enabling you to complete the necessary movements.

MIDDLE AND LOWER TRAPS

The trapezius muscles, also known as the trap muscles are the largest, most powerful back muscles.

They are thus subdivided into the upper, middle and lower traps. However, for this exercise, the middle and lower sections of the

As such, they are the biggest propagators of movements necessary to complete the chest supported rear delt fly. However they are not the primary target, they just act as an anchor.

The middle and lower traps are engaged as soon as you pick up your weights, enabling you to lift the weights.

POSTERIOR AND LATERAL DELTOID

The shoulder is heavily involved in every movement while doing the chest supported rear delt fly i.e., while lifting, midair, or lowered.

The shoulder is mostly involved in helping distribute weight, providing balance and support in order to achieve maximum efficiency.

However, not all parts of the shoulder are engaged. The shoulder is divided into three heads namely the anterior, posterior and lateral deltoids each with a role to play.

Since the chest supported rear delt fly majorly involves moving your arms up and down, the lateral deltoid is the area most worked.

This is because they connect to your shoulder blades thus facilitating said movement.

The posterior deltoid on the other hand comes into action when you need to move your arm backward.

Since the chest supported rear delt fly involves moving the arm upward and backward, the rear deltoid section of the shoulder is also worked with each rep.

CHEST SUPPORTED REAR DELT FLY BENEFITS

IMPROVED POSTURE

Lying on a bench and attempting to do the rear delt fly can be a very difficult undertaking if your form is off.

However, when you have perfect form, the exercise becomes significantly easier. That said, perfect form always comes with extremely beneficial trickle effects such as an aligned spine which leads to good posture.

With every rep, your body gets more and more used to good posture. This filters down into your day-to-day life thereby improving your posture.

STRONG SHOULDERS

The shoulders are a massive part of doing the chest supported rear delt fly. Not only do they provide balance for your arms mid-air, but they also calibrate the momentum that enables you to move your arms up and down.

Doing this consistently forces your arms to adapt to the pressure and weight it is put under. Therefore, with every rep, your shoulders grow stronger making it easier to complete the necessary movements.

A strong shoulder can be very helpful in functional activities as it helps you avoid injuries while handling heavy loads i.e., lifting heavy boxes.

ALTERNATIVES TO THE CHEST SUPPORTED REAR DELT FLY

BENT OVER CABLE REAR DELT FLY

This is a variation of the rear delt fly that involves the use of a cable pulley system. To do this exercise:

  • Stand centred between the cables, facing inwards, and grasp the left cable end in your right hand, and the right cable end in your left hand.
  • Take a small step backward and plant your feet on the floor shoulder-width apart.
  • Hinge forward from your hips so that your torso is parallel to the floor, ensuring that your shoulders are aligned with the poles.
  • Bend your knees slightly and extend your arms to hold the cable ends directly below your chest. This is your starting position.
  • Exhale. While maintaining a slight bend in your elbows, raise the cable ends outwards and upwards from below your chest until they reach shoulder height.
  • Gently lower the cable ends to return to the starting position. Repeat for the specified number of repetitions.

Also read: How to do cable rear delt fly properly

STANDING ROPE FACE PULL

  • Open the carabiner on the machine and clip on the rope attachment.
  • Adjust the pulley to be a little above the height of your head. Then shift the pulley so that it is just above the height of your head before locking it in place.
  • Equip a weight of around 30 pounds to the machine. The right weight will change from person to person, so start around 30 pounds (14 kg) and add more weight as needed.
  • Grasp one end of the rope in each hand. Take a few steps backward until your arms are fully extended toward the machine.
  • Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and your knees bent. Lean back around 20 degrees so all of the work is being done by your arms and shoulders rather than your back
  • Pull the two ropes toward your face, separating your hands and moving them around the side of your head as they get close.
  • Reverse the movement and repeat

MISTAKES TO AVOID

EXCESSIVELY BENDING THE ARMS

While bent arms are a necessary requirement to do the rear delt fly, there is a point where too much is unnecessary.

This is because when you bend your arms too much, you engage the wrong muscles i.e., the upper back instead of the shoulders which should be the primary target.

CARRYING HEAVY WEIGHTS

The goal of the chest supported rear delt fly is not to have you carry the biggest weights, instead, it is to increase efficiency and reduce lower back strain.

As such, you can still achieve impressive results by carrying a correct load of weights. This means starting out light and gauging what’s best for you before graduating up the scale as you get stronger.

CONCLUSION

The chest supported rear delt fly provides efficiency and a low impact exercise as a package deal.

It is therefore a great way to achieve efficiency as a beginner or if you have back problems.