How to Do Barbell Static Hold Properly

The barbell static hold, sometimes also referred to as isometric holds, is the ultimate endurance test. This is one exercise that not only creates but sustains tension on the targeted muscles.

Any exercise that involves the static hold requires you to remain still, to get into a particular position and hold it for as long as you humanly can.

Most people assume that for you to be doing anything substantial, you have to be in motion. But think about the plank, once you drop into position there isn’t much else you do apart from staying in position.

Yet, anybody who has had experience with doing planks will tell you they are nothing but simple.  Every second feels like a whole hour. The same goes for the barbell static hold, it may seem easy, but that is until you start doing it.

HOW TO DO BARBELL STATIC HOLD PROPERLY

  • Stand with the feet shoulder-width apart
  • Hold the barbell with a firm overhand grip, the hands shoulder-width apart too
  • Take a deep breath and slowly bring the barbell up, stop when it gets to eye level
  • Hold this position for as long as you can. 5-7 seconds is ideal but as you begin you can start with 2 seconds and work your way up
  • Breathe out as you slowly lower the barbell, to the initial position in front of the thighs. This is one rep
  • Do as many reps as you can

WHAT MUSCLES DO BARBELL STATIC HOLD WORK?

The barbell static hold primarily works the biceps. Other secondary muscles worked are the chest, shoulders and forearms.

BARBELL STATIC HOLD BENEFITS

MUSCLE GROWTH

The good thing about exercises that incorporate a static hold is that not only do they create tension in the muscle, but they sustain that tension.

The more time spent sustaining this tension, the more muscle breakdown. When the muscles finally recover, you will have realized bigger muscle growth.

STRENGTHENS CORE

Holding your body still will one way or the other engage the core, and the barbell static hold is no different. The time spent under tension when the barbell is held at eye level strengthens the core.

BUILDS RESILIENCE

Holding the barbell while maintaining the correct form is the ultimate test of endurance. Besides making you resilient, it will most definitely help your muscles and joints adapt to the weight you are subjecting it to.

This kind of resilience will help you reduce the risk of injury when you do other exercises that require you to lift.

BARBELL STATIC HOLD ALTERNATIVES

HIGH PLANK

If you work out often, then you are quite familiar with the plank. If you hate it, then that is totally okay because you are not the only one who does.

Yet, for all its bad rep, the plank has proven benefits! That is why people keep coming back for more even if it punishes the sweat out of them.

The high plank works the chest, arms, back, legs, core, shoulder and good old glutes.  The plank essentially gives the whole body a good workout.

How to do the plank:

  • Get down on the floor, on all fours.
  • Spread your fingers, with your hands placed under your shoulders.
  • Put one foot back first, then the other.
  • Lift yourself to your heels.
  • Hold that position for as long as your body will allow you

DOUBLE KETTLEBELL FRONT HOLD RACK

This exercise is one to have you sweating buckets before a minute is out, if you are not, either you are too good and have mad resilience or you are doing it wrong.

You will be holding the kettlebells close to your chest, hence the name. This position is a tad precarious, thus, your body has to summon every other muscle to keep you standing upright and stable, and avoid toppling over.

How to do double kettlebell front hold rack

  • Take a kettlebell in each hand, and they have to be of manageable weight because this exercise play no games
  • Bring them to your chest keep them there
  • Spread your feet so they are shoulder-width apart, keep the ribs tucked down and engage your core
  • At this point, shift your position so that your wrist is neutral and the knuckles of your hands almost opposite each other
  • Bring your elbows close to your body and hold that position for as long as you want
  • If you choose to walk around with the weights, just remember to tighten your core.

BARBELL STATIC HOLD MISTAKES TO AVOID

LACKING CONTROL

This exercise requires you to use all the control your body can gather. Both when lifting the bar and when lowering, all these movements ought to be controlled. Lower the barbell slowly as opposed to dropping it to the floor.

LIFTING TOO HIGH

The recommended height is eye-level. Lifting the barbell higher than the shoulder level on places unnecessary strain on the rear deltoids.

CONCLUSION

The barbell static hold or isometric holds are proof that progress does not always relate to motion. It involves some staying in place but it definitely sets a lot of muscles in your body in motion.

However, much as this exercise is good, you cannot solely depend on it if you are training for high octane activities like running and wrestling. Isometric exercises dwell on strength for the most part.

For these types of activities, you will need to incorporate more dynamic exercises that will improve your speed and resilience on top of strength.

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