How To Do The Lying Rear Delt Raise Properly

The lying rear delt raise is another isolation exercise targeting the shoulders. More specifically, the posterior deltoids.

This is a perfect workout if you are looking to prep your arms and shoulders before weight training. You can also modify your workout by working one arm at a time.

We’ll provide a step-by-step guide on how to perform this exercise since proper form is the most important thing to master before you begin your workout.

  • Lie chest down on a bench with feet on either side. It may be inclined or otherwise
  • Grip a dumbbell in each hand by the handle close to the floor with your elbows bent slightly
  • Pinch your scapula together as you raise your dumbbells to align with your shoulders
  • Your arms should also be parallel to the floor as you hold at the top of this position
  • Lower your arms to the floor back to your starting position then repeat for around ten reps per set

MUSCLES WORKED BY THE LYING REAR DELT RAISE

THE DELTOID

The deltoid is the main muscle of the shoulder which gives your shoulder its rounded structure. It is made up of the anterior, lateral, and posterior deltoid.

All of these three parts work together to move the shoulder and arm and stabilize the shoulder. The posterior and lateral deltoids are the main muscles isolated by this workout.

The posterior deltoid stands to gain the most. It is responsible for lateral rotation of the arm that is, backward and outwards movement of the arm. The lateral deltoid is responsible for the abduction of the arm. The sideways movement of the arm during this exercise is made possible through it.

THE TRAPEZIUS

The trapezius or trap for short is a trapezium-shaped muscle found in the upper back. It is made up of the superior/upper, middle, and inferior/lower fibers. The trap facilitates neck and shoulder movement and helps stabilize the shoulder.

RHOMBOIDS

A rhomboid-shaped muscle located in the upper back, this muscle is found below the trapezius. It’s comprised of the rhomboid major and the rhomboid minor with their insertion in the scapula.

These muscles are responsible for the movement of the scapula and stabilization of the scapula, that is, the shoulder joint.

TRICEPS

This a large muscle at the back of the upper arm consisting of three heads; the medial, lateral, and long head. The triceps stabilize the shoulder and facilitate extension and retraction of the arm.

INFRASPINATUS

The infraspinatus is a triangular-shaped muscle located in the shoulder blade. It, along with three other muscles, is part of the rotator cuff. This means it is partly responsible for the movement and stabilization of the shoulder.

Its main function is the abduction of the arm.

BENEFITS OF THE LYING REAR DELT RAISE

IMPROVE POSTURE

When doing the lying rear delt raise, the chest is flush with the bench as you work the trapezius. This helps correct any previous poor posture by straightening the top of the spine and neck.

INCREASE STRENGTH

Similar to most weight exercises, this workout helps build your muscle which, consequently, increases strength. Due to the shoulder’s wider range of motion, it requires strengthened deltoids and trapezius in order to stabilize it better. This is crucial to athletes since it reduces your risk of injury.

IMPROVES RANGE OF MOTION

Like any isolation exercise, a specific area of muscle is targeted. In this case, your shoulder gains the most from the lying rear delt raises. The shoulder joint can move up to 360 degrees and working the deltoids and other rotator muscles serves to improve this range of motion. This leaves you with more flexible arms specifically, at the shoulder joint.

ALTERNATIVES TO THE LYING REAR DELT RAISE

STANDING BENT-OVER DUMBBELL RAISE

This is a dumbbell exercise that is a slight variation from the lying rear delt raise. It targets the deltoids, trapezius and triceps just like the lying rear delt raise.

  • Stand with your feet planted right below your knees.
  • Bend slightly at the knees hinging at the hips with your spine remaining neutral.
  • Grab a dumbbell in each hand and hold them close to the ground with your arm extended.
  • Open your arms as you raise the dumbbells, your elbow should form a ninety-degree angle.
  • Pause before repeating for twelve reps.

UPPER CABLES CROSSOVER

Aside from the shoulder, the upper cables crossover works the upper pec. However, the deltoids are still a major region that benefits from it, similar to the lying rear delt raise.

  • Stand in front of a cable machine with the weights slightly below you.
  • Grip the cable from below the chest and pull to the top and front of the head.
  • Cross the right hand over the left one at the forehead.
  • Open your arms and shoulders as you let the cable move back to starting position.

COMMON MISTAKES WHEN DOING THE LYING REAR DELT RAISE

ARCHING OFF THE BENCH

Arching the body off the bench is a common mistake when raising the dumbbells. This fails to engage the deltoids which are the main muscles targeted by the lying rear delt raise. Keep your body flush to the inclined bench through the entire exercise to reap all the benefits.

USING TOO MUCH MOMENTUM

This is painfully common in exercises involving small weights like this. As tempting as it is to swing the dumbbells or use gravity to your advantage and just drop them, it is dangerous. You could easily tear a shoulder with this kind of disregard. Be careful when handling your weight. Go for smooth controlled movements to avoid any mishaps.

USING VERY HEAVY WEIGHT

You should know that the deltoids should not be worked with as heavy weight as the biceps. Use a dumbbell of smaller weight then add on to this weight if you find the workout too easy. Using too heavy of a dumbbell can cause you to injure your shoulder.

CONCLUSION

The improvement in posture, strength, and range of motion is reason enough why you should add this to your daily or weekly workout. So long as you maintain proper form and pick a good dumbbell, you are sure to mark this as a favorite.