How To Do The Landmine Deadlift Properly

The landmine deadlift involves placing a barbell in a landmine attachment, then adding as many weight plates as you desire to the free end of the barbell.

Many athletes prefer it to the traditional deadlift because it places less strain on the spine by allowing your back to be in an upright position during the exercise.

To do it properly, follow these steps:

  • Put the barbell in the landmine attachment. If you want to use a load, feel free to put the desired number of weight plates on the end of the barbell that lies opposite the landmine attachment.
  • Stand facing the landmine attachment and the barbell (which means your body should be perpendicular to the barbell).
  • Position your feet shoulder-width apart.
  • Grab the end of the barbell with your hands behind the weight plates. You can interlock your fingers for a better grip.
  • Engage your back and lats as you roll your shoulder blades back slightly.
  • Flatten your lower back and put your neck in a neutral position.
  • Start lifting the weight up by driving through your feet, hinging your hips back and forward, and straightening your arms.
  • When you get to the top position where you are standing up with the weight, squeeze your glutes.
  • Hold this position for a few minutes before lowering the weight slowly and with control by pushing the hips back.
  • Repeat this motion as many times as you desire.

WHAT MUSCLES DOES THE LANDMINE DEADLIFT WORK?

This exercise trains almost every major muscle group on your body, with the main focus on the muscles on your posterior chain.

The three major groups targeted here are the hamstrings, glutes and spinal erectors.

Your glutes primarily extend your hips while the hamstrings stabilize your knee and leg joints as you lift the barbell up.

The spinal erectors help extend your back and keep it stable during the lift.

Other muscles worked during this exercise are the quads, forearms, lats, obliques, abs and trapezius.

BENEFITS OF THE LANDMINE DEADLIFT

SAFER WAY TO DEADLIFT

The landmine deadlift is a relatively safer way to deadlift compared to the standard deadlift since it places less strain on your spine and lower back.

This is because it allows the barbell to travel through a fixed path, which enables your back to remain upright.

TRAINS HIP HINGE

The landmine deadlift is a fantastic way to train and improve your hip hinge, which makes it easier for you to perform other exercises that require you to hinge your hips such as the squat.

COMPOUND EXERCISE

Just like the traditional deadlift, the landmine deadlift trains multiple muscle groups and joints in your body at the same time, either directly or indirectly.

BETTER POSTURE

The main cause of poor posture is an underdeveloped posterior chain.

Since the landmine deadlift trains your posterior chain, it can help develop the muscles along it hence improving your posture.

ALTERNATIVES TO THE LANDMINE DEADLIFT

BARBELL HIP THRUST

The barbell hip thrust targets the most of the muscles involved in the barbell hip thrust, such as the glutes, quads and hamstrings.

Instructions:

  • Lie on a workout bench with your back pressed on it.
  • Bring a barbell up to your hip crease.
  • Drive both your feet through the ground and tighten your glutes while pushing your hips up.
  • Lower the hips to the starting position and repeat as many times as you desire.

LANDMINE ROMANIAN DEADLIFT

This variation is quite similar to the standard one, except you do it with stiff legs.

It also places heavy emphasis on your posterior chain, especially your hamstrings and glutes.

Steps:

  • Start by setting up the barbell in the landmine. Load the free end of the barbell as desired.
  • Stand in front of the free end, your feet hip-width apart.
  • Push your hips back and grasp the barbell sleeve as you interlock your fingers.
  • Lift the weight as you would in the traditional landmine deadlift.
  • When you get into the upright position, tighten your core, and engage your upper back and lats.
  • With your back straight and flat, push your hips back and hinge your torso forward.
  • Slightly bend your knees so that your legs are almost straight.
  • Keep lowering your torso and the barbell until you are almost parallel to the ground or until you feel your hamstrings stretch completely.
  • Hold this position for a second before extending your hips by pushing them forward.
  • Return to the starting position.
  • Do as many reps as you desire.

LANDMINE DEADLIFT MISTAKES TO AVOID

NOT FIXING THE BARBELL PROPERLY

The first thing you should check before you even begin this exercise is that the barbell is tightly fixed and it is not moving around much.

This is especially important if you choose to place the barbell in a corner. You could get badly hurt if it gets out of place while you are performing the exercise.

TOO MUCH WEIGHT

Ideally, you should start with a light weight so that you master the correct technique before adding heavier weights.

This will also give you a chance to experiment with different leg positions to figure out the one that you prefer the most.

NOT TIGHTENING THE CORE

Keep your core tight and engaged as you lift to help you maintain the correct form and minimize the risk of spinal injury.

NOT KEEPING YOUR SPINE NEUTRAL

Your spine should be in a neutral position for the entire workout.

To achieve this, you need to flatten your back and look forward. This will lessen the strain on your spine and minimize the risk of injury.

LITTLE ROOM FOR THE GRIP

Be sure to leave enough space at the end of the barbell sleeve so that you are able to grasp it with a better grip.

CONCLUSION

The landmine deadlift will help you work the same muscles with very minimal strain on your spine and lower back.

It trains your posterior chain to give you a better posture and spinal stability.

If you are tired of doing the traditional deadlift, this variation is a perfect and safer substitute for it.