How To Do Reverse Grip Pushdown Properly

The reverse grip pushdown is a variation of the lat pulldown exercise. It’s an excellent exercise for your triceps, shoulders, and a few other muscles.

This exercise is valuable for women and men looking to build upper-body mass. But, like any exercise, only if you know how to do it correctly. If not performed correctly, the risk of injury and burnout is greater.

You can incorporate this exercise in a complete upper body workout. In most cases, people perform a reverse grip pushdown to improve their triceps, but it’s also well suited for people who strive to work their biceps.

This exercise is a great way to work on your back and arms at once. The reverse grip pushdown is done with a lat pulldown machine (although cable machines will work fine, too. So, let’s see how to perform this exercise correctly and the benefits this exercise gives us!

HOW TO DO REVERSE GRIP PUSHDOWN PROPERLY

  • Attach a bar to a high cable pulley with a narrow, parallel grip attachment. Hold the bar with at the chest height, the palms facing your torso (supinated grip) and your hands slightly less than shoulder-width apart. This will be your starting position.
  • Lower down the bar to the front of your thighs. Your arms should be fully extended perpendicular to the floor. Concentrate on squeezing the back arm muscles as you reach the full contracted position. The upper arms should remain stationary next to your torso, and only your forearms should move. Exhale.
  • Hold a contracted position on the triceps for a second and bring the bar slowly to the starting point. Breathe in as you perform this step.
  • Repeat this until you reach your desired number of repetitions.

WHAT MUSCLES DOES REVERSE GRIP PUSHDOWN WORK?

 Reverse grip pushdown is suitable for your arms. It works the following four muscles: Triceps Brachii, Teres Major, rhomboids, and Latissimus dorsi.

TRICEPS BRACHII

For those who want more muscular arms, the triceps brachii is your best friend. They’re the three-headed muscles that run from your elbow to your shoulder and make up almost 3/4 of your arm muscle mass.

These muscles are responsible for extending the arms and straightening them. Building these muscles up while also getting definition in your shoulders and biceps will make you look like a total boss.

Additionally, since you use your arms to lift and pull, a strong triceps brachii can benefit many activities and sports.

TERES MAJOR

The Teres Major is a deep back muscle that sits just below the infraspinatus and teres minor. It connects your shoulder blade to your upper arm bone. This muscle assists with the arm’s internal rotation, extension, and adduction. It also aids in movements like pulling things toward your back or rotating your arm.

Teres Major helps you with moves such as hugging and putting your arm behind your back.

Exercising these muscles helps improve shoulder joint stability, flexibility, and upper body performance during activities.

It also helps prevent injury and pain during exercises.

RHOMBOIDS

They are a group of muscles in your upper back that connect the shoulder blades to the spine and hold your shoulders together. The rhomboids are super important for building upper body strength since they help you stabilize your shoulders.

They also keep them in place while lifting weights or doing other strength training. Strong rhomboids also help prevent shoulder injuries and protect against back pain since these muscles support your spine.

LATISSIMUS DORSI

The latissimus dorsi muscle group is a large, triangular muscle covering the upper and middle back.  It’s shaped like a triangle or fan and connects the upper arms to the body.

It’s responsible for movement at the shoulder joint and the shoulder blade (or scapulae). It also helps move the spine and pelvis.

It allows you to move your shoulders in several ways, including backward, downwards, and sideways. Additionally, it helps carry out many other activities that involve pulling or reaching overhead with your arms. It’s also responsible for expanding your chest when breathing.

Strong lats give you more power in all areas of life!

REVERSE GRIP PUSHDOWN BENEFITS

1.      STRENGTHENS THE MUSCLES IN YOUR UPPER ARMS AND SHOULDERS

The primary muscle targeted by the reverse grip pushdown is your triceps. The muscles in your shoulders, particularly the deltoids, are also activated during the movement. The workout also helps improve strength in your core muscles and lower back.

2.      IMPROVES OVERALL ATHLETICISM

Reverse grip pushdown can help improve your athletic performance because it strengthens your arm, shoulder, and core muscles. These muscles are critical for proper form when performing other sports-related activities, such as throwing a ball or swinging a bat or racket.

3.      IT CAN BE EASILY MODIFIED TO HELP YOU REACH SPECIFIC GOALS

You can easily adjust the reverse grip pushdown to become more challenging or easier based on how much weight you use and how quickly you perform each repetition.

ALTERNATIVES TO REVERSE GRIP PUSHDOWN

Here are some exercises you can try if you’re looking for alternatives to the reverse grip pushdown.

DUMBBELL SKULL CRUSHERS

Also known as lying extensions, this exercise allows you to isolate your triceps and works all three heads. It also works your anterior deltoids and pectorals.

Steps

  • Lie flat on the bench, then plant your feet firmly on the floor or another flat surface. Hold your dumbbell with both hands straight above your head.
  • With palms facing each other and elbows bent, slowly lower the dumbbell behind your head until your arms are about 90 degrees.
  • Pause before squeezing your triceps to raise the dumbbell back up to the original position.

STANDING DUMBBELL TRICEPS EXTENSION

The standing dumbbell triceps extension can be a great way to give your triceps a good workout if you’re starting. It primarily works the heads of the triceps and also activates the glutes, core, and lower back muscles.

Steps

  • Standing tall with your feet shoulder-width apart with a dumbbell in each hand, holding them at arm’s length. Your palms should face your torso. This will be your starting position.
  • Lower the weights behind your head, keeping upper arms close to your head (elbows in) and perpendicular to the floor. Inhale as you perform the move.
  • Pause once the dumbbells are directly above the back of your shoulders. Then bring the dumbbells to the starting position.
  • Exhale in this portion of the movement.

REVERSE GRIP PUSHDOWN MISTAKES TO AVOID

GRIP THE BAR TOO WIDE

If your grip on the bar is too wide when doing the reverse grip pushdown, your elbows will flare out and put unnecessary stress on your shoulders. Make sure you hold the bar with your hands about shoulder-width apart.

LOCKOUT YOUR ELBOWS AT THE BOTTOM OF THE MOVEMENT

It’s good to keep tension on your triceps throughout the reverse grip pushdown workout. So don’t lock out your elbows at the bottom of the movement. Instead, lower the elbows until you feel a stretch in your triceps and push back up.