How To Do Monster Walk Properly

If you’re a runner and want to improve your Gluteus Medius strength, the monster walk is the best exercise for this.

This exercise helps strengthen the hips, primarily the gluteus medius muscle, stabilizing your knees.

Monster walk fits everyone and targets the knees and the hips joints. It helps build up your lower body and gives you a tight, firm, and toned butt.

It also helps to increase your balance and coordination and reduces the risk of injuries.

To perform an efficient monster walk, you need 1 to 2 medium resistance bands. You can also try the workout without the band, and then add one band after you have perfected your moves.

HOW TO DO MONSTER WALK PROPERLY

  • Place the band around both your legs. For a challenging move, place the band on the ankles. For a simple move, place the band higher up your leg.
  • Step your feet out wide between your shoulder widths and hip-width. Drop into a half squat position. Engage your core and push your butt backward.
  • Ensure your knees are about 45 degrees angle to 120 degrees angle and behind your toes throughout the exercise.
  • Step your right feet forward and out. Ensure your toes are pointing forward and your knees and feet are out, keeping constant tension on the band.
  • Now step your left foot forward and walk forward, alternating your feet. You can take longer steps (monster steps) as you get stronger.
  • Now walk backward and maintain the squat position following all forward principles. Go back to the start position. This counts as one rep.
  • You can now try with two bands. Take the one on the knees higher up your leg. Place the other one around your thigh. Maintain the half squat position throughout the movements.

WHAT MUSCLES DOES MONSTER WALK WORKS?

Monster walk works out your hip and glute muscles. It works your gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, gluteus minimus, hip flexors, inner and outer thighs.

GLUTEUS MAXIMUS

The gluteus maximus is a thick fleshy mass in a quadrilateral shape that forms the prominence of the butt.

It’s the primary extensor muscle of the hip and the largest and outermost of the three gluteal muscles.

The muscle makes up the appearance and shape of the hips. Also, it keeps you upright and helps in pushing your body forward.

Strong glutes help you make explosive movements such as running and jumping.

In addition, they are essential for proper pelvic alignment and push you forward while walking.

GLUTEUS MEDIUS AND GLUTEUS MINIMUS

Gluteus medius is a broad, thick, radiating muscle on the pelvis’s outer surface, and the Gluteus minimus is the tiniest muscle of the glutei.

The muscles share the same features, including structure and function.

They work together to promote hip abduction and prevent hip adduction. These muscles also help stabilize the hip and provide balance.

Strong Gluteus medius and minimus help maintain the stability of the hip, fill out your booty, keeping it firm.

Additionally, they help improve athlete performance and reduce the risk of stress on the lower limbs.

HIP FLEXORS

These are a group of muscles found near the front of your hips. The muscles help move or flex your leg, bringing your knees towards your chest.

They also play a crucial role in stabilizing the pelvis and spine.

Also, they help you make explosive movements, reducing the risks of injuring your lower back.

Exercising the muscles helps you hold your body upright, move it forward and maintain a good posture.

 HAMSTRINGS

These muscles are found at the back of your thigh. They are used for walking, climbing stairs, performing squats, and other leg movements.

In addition, hamstrings help bend your knees and draw your hips backward.

 

Exercising the muscles improves the overall leg strength, flexibility, lower back pain, and protection from injuries.

Additionally, they allow your knees, legs, back, and hips to function smoothly.

BICEPS FEMORIS

The muscle is part of the hamstrings that arise proximally by a long superficial head and short, deep head.

It’s a muscle in the posterior compartment of the thigh that lies in the posterolateral aspect.

The muscle is responsible for hips and knee joint movements and allows thigh extension and external rotation at the hip.

It also provides knee flexion and lower leg external rotation at the knee.

Exercising this muscle prevents injuries to the low back, hips, and entire lower body.

BENEFITS OF MONSTER WALK

This is an excellent exercise that benefits athletes and those who gluteal activation has been affected.

1.     IMPROVED BALANCE AND COORDINATION

Monster walk exercise gives you the ability to strengthen your connective tissue. It helps build your stability when walking and running and improves your posture. It allows your knees, legs, back, and hips to function and coordinate smoothly.

2.     REDUCED INJURY RISKS

The monster walk helps you work out with different leg and hip muscles. It concentrates more on the hip, knee, and ankle joints. As a result, the muscle gets strong, reducing the risk of injuries around the lower body parts.

3.     BEAUTIFUL BUTT

Performing the monster walk builds up your butt. It tightens and makes your butt more toned, making it more firm.

ALTERNATIVE TO MONSTER WALK

TOE TAP

This exercise targets the lower body muscles working out the quadriceps, hamstrings, glutes, hip flexors, and calves. When performing this exercise, find high ground or a stable bench to avoid tripping.

How to do toe-tap:

  •  Stand in front of the high ground or bench.
  • Raise your right foot and place it on the elevated ground/bench. The left feet remain on the floor, and keep your arms straight on the sides.
  • Push the left foot off the ground towards the bench. Switch the leg in mid-air such that your right foot is now on the floor.
  • Alternate your feet without stopping, increasing your pace as you exercise.
  • After 30 seconds, step both feet on the ground and take a break. This counts as one rep.

LATERAL MONSTER SQUATS

The exercise requires you to move side to side and targets the hip and glutes muscles.

How to perform monster squats:

  • Begin in a half-squat position with your legs shoulder-width apart.
  • Take a wide step with your lead feet followed immediately by your other leg.
  • Take ten steps, and then repeat moving back in the opposite direction.

MONSTER WALK MISTAKES TO AVOID

1.     LOSING CONTROL OF THE LEAD FOOT

When doing the monster walk, you need to start at a slow pace, then add speed slowly. Sometimes, if you move fast, you might lose control of which leg is to go forward. This results in your losing balance and may lead to you tripping. Also, you miss exercising your targeted hip muscles.

2.     POOR BAND RESISTANCE TENSION

You need to check on how elastic your resistance band is. Use a band with the required tension for the monster walk exercise to be effective.

The proper band tension helps you get the most out of the workout. Furthermore, it ensures glute muscles are fully exercised.

3.     FAILING TO ENGAGE YOUR CORE

The monster walk may not mainly focus on the core, but you have to engage and sustain your core throughout your reps. It’s also good to always maintain a straight back and your body facing forward. This helps you minimize fidgeting during the movements.