How to Do Kettlebell Push Press Properly

The kettlebell push press is a variation of the clean and press that incorporates some bit of leg movement to the conventional move.

Normally when you are doing the kettlebell overhead, people struggle the most with lifting the weight from the racked position which is around the chest to the part where you hold it above the head. This point has a name among the fitness junkies, and it is known as the hole.

Incorporate some leg movement into your exercise in order to transition the kettlebell smoothly from the hole.

HOW TO DO KETTLEBELL PUSH PRESS PROPERLY

This example will make use of two kettlebells

  • Place the kettlebells in front of you, about a foot from your mean position.
  • Drop to a deadlift position, take a hold of a kettlebell in each hand and lift them to chest level.
  • Engage the core, bend your knees and breathe out while driving your feet into the floor and get back to the standing position. Make use of this momentum to lift the kettlebells above your head, making sure the arms are straight while you do so.
  • Return the kettlebells to the racked position and repeat for your desired number of repetitions.

WHAT MUSCLES DOES KETTLEBELL PUSH PRESS WORK? 

Given that this exercise involves swinging the arms while carrying weights, it is easy to assume that most of the work goes to the arm muscles. It is true that muscles in the arms and the upper body area like the triceps, lats and shoulders do get a good working.

But it is the hips and the glutes that get the bulk of the impact of this exercise. Most of the explosive power comes from the hips and legs, and it is used to propel the weight past the racked position.

Add this exercise to your routine in order to add muscle strength and improve your cardiovascular health.

KETTLEBELL PUSH PRESS BENEFITS

BETTER ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE

Are you a runner? Do you engage in activities that require some involvement of jumping? Then you must understand how important power output is to your performance.
If you are more of a track events person then overhead movements may not do much because the focus is on the lower body.
But the explosive nature of the kettlebell push press comes very handy if you engage in exercises such as sprinting.

COMPOUND EXERCISE

This exercise is a powerhouse that engages multiple muscle groups at once. The impact is not limited to the upper body, but can be felt in the lower body as well. It works the chest, glutes, back and even shoulders.

UTILISES MOMENTUM

Try the overhead press exercise and you will realise that lifting the weight from the racked position is no easy feat. One huge advantage of this kettlebell push press variation is that the momentum from the legs pushes the weight through the racked position. You will not struggle as hard.

MORE WEIGHT

The amount of weight you carry ranks lower than the right form in the order of priority. However, everybody who works out lives for progress, and you do not want to be stuck with the weight you started with for a long time.

A strict military press constricts and confines you to manageable weight, given the kind of effort you need to get from the racked position.

The kettlebell push press on the other hand allows you to press more weight, which is good motivation.

KETTLEBELL PUSH PRESS MISTAKES TO AVOID

PRESSING HEAVY

Kettlebells increase by 4kgs, which means that if you use a 16kg one in your exercises, the next one comes in 20kgs. Might seem like a little theoretically, but try to make this shift fast and you will quickly realise that you are stuck and frustrated.

Take your time to master and own the weight you are using. Sure, we have mentioned that this variation makes it easy to progress as compared to a military press.

But this does not mean that linear progression will be immediately possible.

Use a lighter to try other variations until you are comfortable with pretty much every aspect of the overhead press, then work your way up from there.

USING A BENT WRIST

Our first intuition is to hold any weight with the middle of our hands We almost instinctively assume that that is the strongest part of the arm and that we have the most control that way.

While this might work with dumbbells, try the same with kettlebells and you will be bending the wrist at such an awkward position that you will be lucky if you do not get off with an injured wrist.