How To Do The Trx Lunge Properly

The trx lunge is a compound calisthenics exercise that mainly targets your quads but also works your glutes, hamstrings and calves as secondary muscles.

There are different trx lunge variations that require different equipment but this basic version only requires a trx suspension trainer.

Learning it is quite easy because it follows the same movement pattern as the standard lunge, only with extra resistance from the trainer.

Here are the steps describing the correct technique:

  • Anchor the suspension trainer over your head and put it into single-handle mode to combine the two handles into one.
  • Set the trainer to mid-calf length. Mid-calf length should be about 8-12 inches off the ground.
  • Stand facing away from the anchor point and make sure the strap is level with your hips at the starting position.
  • Use your hand to push your right foot into the strap.
  • Push your hips back and down to lower yourself into a half-kneeling position. At this point, the right knee should be hovering just above the ground and the front knee vertical to the ankle.
  • Drive through your front heel and extend your hips to return to where you started. As you stand, the right knee should come forward to the front of your body.
  • Repeat for your desired number of reps.

WHAT MUSCLES DOES THE TRX LUNGE WORK?

The primary muscles recruited during the trx lunge are the quadriceps.

The quadriceps, alongside your glutes, strengthen your hips and knees to help drive you up from the bottom of the rep.

During this exercise, your hamstrings help you slow down as you lower yourself.

They also work together with your glutes to extend your hips as you drive up to the top of the movement.

Together with the gluteus medius, the hamstrings help stabilize your knees and hips throughout the movement.

Your calves are also engaged to a lesser degree when you drive up through your foot to get back up.

BENEFITS OF THE TRX LUNGE

YOU CAN MODIFY IT

This movement is ideal to people of every fitness level as it can be easily modified to make it easier or more challenging.

Beginners who still have limited stability can lower the knee all the way to the floor instead of letting it hover just above the ground.

For people who feel confident in their balance and mobility, jumping up from the lunge is an option.

In this case, instead of driving up slowly from the bottom position, you will jump up with the other leg as you bring the working knee up simultaneously.

CORRECTS ASSYMETRY

The trx lunge is a unilateral exercise, meaning it works each side of your lower body independently.

This can help correct any existing muscular imbalances and asymmetry especially in cases where the less dominant side is often neglected.

STRENGTHENS LOWER BODY MUSCLE GROUPS

This exercise works multiple large muscle groups in your lower body at the same time, which boosts your lower body strength and bone density.

PREVENTS INJURY

By enhancing stability at both the knee and hip joint, the trx lunge can help reduce the risk of sustaining knee injuries.

IT IS FUNCTIONAL

This exercise is highly functional; it mimics the movement patterns that you use in your daily activities like walking, biking and running.

By building your stability and strength, it helps your joints and muscles tackle these activities with a lot more ease.

ALTERNATIVES TO THE TRX LUNGE

TRX CROSS BALANCE LUNGE

This is a variation of the trx lunge that requires you to cross one foot behind the other instead of extending it straight out.

Steps:

  • Attach suspension cables securely to a point above your head.
  • Adjust the cables so that they are hanging down mid-length.
  • Stand upright facing the anchor point and grab the handles, one in each hand.
  • Step back until the cables are completely tight. Your arms should be stretched forward with your palms facing each other.
  • Tighten your core, maintain a neutral spine and center your leg left with the anchor point. This is the starting position.
  • Extend your right leg behind you and rotate it externally as you get into the lunge position.
  • Push through your left heel to reverse the steps and get back to where you started.
  • After you finish the desired number of reps, switch legs.

FORWARD LUNGE

The forward lunge also helps you target your quadriceps primarily .

Here’s how to do it:

  • Stand upright, feet hip-width apart.
  • Place your hands on your hips and take a step forward with your right leg.
  • As you step forward, shift your bodyweight forward too so that your heel hits the ground first.
  • Keep lowering your body until the right thigh lies parallel to the floor.
  • Push into your right heel to get back up.
  • Repeat the steps on the other side.

TRX LUNGE MISTAKES TO AVOID

STEPPING TOO FAR OUT

Take care not to step too far out at the starting position.

The further away you go from the anchor point, the more you shift the focus from your quads to your hamstrings and glutes.

Stay close to the anchor point to maintain the primary focus on your quads.

MOVING TOO FAST

Control your speed during both the lowering and driving up phases to channel as much tension  as you can into your muscles.

Moving too quickly may tire you out very fast with no actual activation in your muscles.

CURVING YOUR BACK

To avoid placing unnecessary pressure on your spine, keep a neutral back as you lower into the lunge and drive back up.

A proper posture will also help you focus on your quads for better results.

TO CONCLUDE

When it comes to lunges of any kind, the primary muscles worked heavily depend on how you position your body during the workout.

For the trx lunge for instance, you must stay relatively close to the anchor point for you to maintain the primary focus on your quadriceps.

Stay consistent, pay attention to the form, avoid the mistakes mentioned and you’ll do just fine.