How To Do Wall Walks Properly

Wall Walks are a bodyweight strength training exercise. It is also considered a challenging gymnastic movement that builds strength, coordination, and balance.

It involves climbing from the ground in a prone position, getting into a handstand against a wall, and then back down to the ground again. If you find it difficult to go all the way up, you can try to climb only halfway up the wall

The wall walks are a progression towards handstand push-ups, or handstand walks. However, they are much more inclusive than these handstand variations.

All you need to perform this move is a floor and a wall. You can also use wrist wraps to provide extra support for your joints.

Essentially, the move requires intermediate level of fitness and experience training.

HOW TO DO WALL WALKS

Here are the steps for doing the wall walks.

  • Get into a push up position with your face down on the floor and feet touching the wall behind you. Keep your butt and abs squeezed.
  • Ensure that you keep your hands, chest and quads flat on the floor. Also, your spine should be kept neutral and head down.
  • Press to the top of a push up then slowly climb your feet up the wall, with your hands following suit. Extend your arms throughout.
  • Continue with the move until your chest and thighs touch the wall.
  • Now, slowly move your hands away from the wall and walk your feet down. This will return you back to the starting prone position.

WALL WALKS MUSCLES ENGAGED

The exercise works the muscles of the back, core, shoulders, glutes and arms.

It is the responsibility of the core and abs to stabilize and control the body during the move. Consequently, they help to protect the spine.

The deltoids are responsible for keeping the shoulders flexed with the hands above the head.

The rotator cuff is engaged to stabilize the shoulders throughout the full range of motion.

Finally, the triceps function to hold the elbow joint in place and consequently balance the body during the exercise.

WALL WALKS BENEFITS

IMPROVE BALANCE AND COORDINATION

This is quite a challenging move that requires you to balance and control your body carefully and effectively.

Consistently doing the move or adding it into your workout routine, will help improve your balance and coordination.

As a result, you will be able to control, move and understand your body better.

STIMULATE MUSCLE GROWTH

A lot of time is spent under tension and this forces your muscles to work hard. This is particularly helpful when it comes to hypertrophy.

Also, since the move is quite unusual, the new stimulus provided kickstarts your body muscles to adapt and develop in new ways.

STRENGTHEN THE CORE

This move requires a rigid and tight core to stabilize the body and control body movement throughout the range of motion. Therefore, it is a great core strengthening movement.

ENHANCE OVERHEAD CONFIDENCE

Doing any handstand variation or other inverted moves can be scary if you’re not used to being upside down. Generally, you need a certain degree of confidence and commitment to be able to do them.

Fortunately, practicing with the wall walks will help to build up your confidence and improve your control.

BUILD STABILITY

A strengthened core will help improve your full body stability. Stability is not only important for your daily activities but also for other exercises like running and lifting.

In general, it basically enhances your fitness.

WALL WALKS ALTERNATIVES

HANDSTAND HOLD

Handstand hold engages and effectively builds multiple muscle groups throughout the entire body. These include the core, back, triceps, trapezius muscles, hamstrings, and deltoids.

There are several benefits to performing the handstand hold.

HANDSTAND HOLD AGAINST THE WALL

You can also perform the handstand hold against the wall. Basically, the wall will help you to stabilize your position.

In addition, if you use the correct form then you will work your abdominals, back muscles, hip flexors, hamstrings and thigh muscles.

Developing the above muscles are important if you want to further attempt a free handstand in the future.

HANDSTAND PUSH UPS

Handstand push-ups are an effective exercise that engage and develop multiple muscle groups like the core, back, chest, arms and shoulders. Performing the move has several benefits.

The main benefit, like all other push-ups, is increased upper body strength.

PIKE PUSH UPS

The pike push ups are a challenging variation of the regular push up. It helps improve shoulder strength and develop core stability.

It targets the shoulders, arms, chest, back, and core, thus, toning and strengthening your entire upper body. However, it is important that you maintain perfect form for optimal results and prevent injury risk.

BEAR CRAWLS

The bear crawls are a great addition to your workout routine. Not only do they build strength and power, they also boost your metabolism and increase your cardio fitness.

In addition, they offer a great mental challenge. This is because your brain has to focus on maintaining balance while at the same time moving all your limbs at once.

WALL WALKS MISTAKES TO AVOID

RUSHING THE MOVE

Do not rush the movement as your shoulders will burn out quickly. This could result in you losing stability and control thus, risk injury.

Ensure that you use a slow and steady pace together with a good breathing pattern.

IMPROPER FORM

Ensure that you perform the exercise correctly as this will help you maintain control. Ensure your arms are kept extended, back is straight and you use control.

Not only will you reap optimal benefits but also prevent injury.

LOSING CONTROL

Do not risk losing control in order to complete a movement. It is better that you do fewer reps or even an incomplete movement but with control.

However, consistent practice over time is all you need to be able to do more reps with proper form.

CONCLUSION

The wall walks are a great progression exercise towards an efficient handstand push-up and other handstand variations. It builds confidence and familiarity with being inverted down while improving your upper body strength.