How To Do Standing Wrist Curl Properly

The standing wrist curl is an undeniably effective forearm exercise. It is convenient, easy to set up, and will undoubtedly blast your forearm flexors.

The drill is quite effortless as all you need to do is grab and lift your appropriate fixed barbell. However, some people still mess this simple technique up.

Moreover, others have weak lower arms. Therefore, it is important to strengthen this area using the exercise so as to protect against muscle sprains.

The exercise is done using an overhand grip in order to build the forearm flexors.

As an isolation exercise for the forearms, it is great for improving lifting motions in daily activities or sports.

HOW TO DO STANDING WRIST CURL

Here is a step-by-step procedure of performing the exercise.

  • Start by holding a barbell in front of you shoulder-width apart. Ensure that you are using an overhand grip to hold the barbell.
  • Hold a straight gaze while your elbows are fully locked out. This will be your starting position.
  • Now, flex your wrists towards you to curl the bar. Ensure that your arms remain stationary throughout.
  • At the top of the movement, contract as hard as you can the underside of your forearms.
  • Then, lower the bar under control and gradually back to the starting position. Ensure that the wrists are completely extended.
  • Repeat the move for the desired number of reps.

STANDING WRIST CURL MUSCLES ENGAGED

The exercise targets different muscles either for stabilization, direct movement or simple flexibility. The primary muscles targeted are the flexor carpi ulnaris, flexor carpi radialis and palmaris longus.
The finger flexors, both deep and superficial, and flexor pollicis longus, are secondary muscles targeted. Other antagonists muscles include the extensor carpi ulnaris and extensor digitorum

STANDING WRIST CURL BENEFITS

GREATER TRAINING EFFICIENCY

The standing wrist curl simply requires you to pick and lift either the fixed or Olympic barbell. This is unlike other wrist curls where there is always a huddle.

It is difficult to get a proper grip during the behind-the-back barbell wrist curl, as you can’t properly see where you’re putting your hands. You also need a bench when performing the dumbbell wrist curl meaning that you will need to wait for one to become available especially in busy gyms.

Therefore, the standing wrist curl is convenient and efficient as it gives you the incentive to work your lower arm consistently.

You can also alternate the move with standing reverse wrist curls at the same time to get an incredible pump in the process.

BUILDS MASSIVE FOREARM FLEXORS

The movement is a great mass builder as it allows you to lift much more weight than the other lower arm exercises.

It is better to stick to the basic simplified exercise other than exploring many fancy forearm movements. This is because as a beginner and intermediate, you are guaranteed better results by focusing on form and progressive overload.

Furthermore, having strengthened forearms will help your grip not give out as quickly and this will improve your performance in compound lifts. Consequently, you will gain a more muscular physique.

STRONGER WRISTS

Using the proper form during the exercise will build the strength of your wrists. This will make them injury resistant as you are training them to handle significant tension.

Be careful not to use poor form as it could cause wrist sprains.

STANDING WRIST CURL ALTERNATIVES

BARBELL REVERSE WRIST CURL

The Barbell reverse wrist curl is also type of isolating exercise for the forearms. In addition to strengthening the forearms and other muscles, it also increases flexibility at the same time.

The muscles this workout targets are the flexor carpi muscles, the brachioradialis, the palmaris longus, the pronator muscles, the flexor digitorum muscles and the supinator muscle. These muscles all contribute to the movement either by stabilization, direct movement or simple flexibility.

CABLE WRIST CURL

The Cable wrist curl is another variation that builds up the lower arm muscles. Cables are excellent tools for building forearms as they work and benefit just as much as barbells and dumbbells.

Also, cables over a variety of positions and attachments that you can utilize.

FOREARM PLATE CURL

The Forearm plate curl is an unconventional exercise that you may incorporate in your forearm training. They build up your flexors while also strengthening your grip.

Additionally, they beef up mass over your forearm bones, and strengthen your hands for compound pulling exercises

FOREARM TWIST

The Forearm twist challenges all muscles in your forearm, particularly, the flexors and extensors. These two are constantly challenged.

STANDING WRIST CURL MISTAKES TO AVOID

LIFTING TOO MUCH WEIGHT

Do not use too much weight like the one you would use for bench press or biceps curl. Remember the wrists and forearms are not particularly strong muscles.

Especially for beginners, it is better to start with light weights. Then as you continue to gain strength, you can advance to heavier weights.

Essentially, lighter weights allow you to use the proper technique. Heavier weights do not make the exercise more effective.

THRUSTING THE WEIGHT

Do not recklessly thrust your weights as this can strain your wrist and cause injury. Ensure that you move steadily and under control with each repetition.

For added intensity, contract your forearms at the top of the movement.

USING PARTIAL RANGE OF MOTION

Do not use a partial range of motion as you will not reap optimal benefits from the move. Dropping the weight as far as possible at the bottom of the movement is recommended for best results.

HOLDING YOUR BREATH

Do not hold your breath during the exercise as this usually shifts the focus away from your forearms. This could not only lead to tension and strain in the body but also affect your blood pressure.

Ensure that you maintain proper breathing throughout the move. This involves exhaling while you curl upward and inhaling when going back to the initial position.

CONCLUSION

The standing wrist curl is an all-time go-to forearm isolation exercise. It is recommended that you alternate the exercise with the “reverse wrist curl” so as to ensure that the wrist flexor and wrist extensor muscles develop equally.