How To Do Seated Knee Tucks Properly

Seated knee tucks are a killer core workout exercise. Not only that, they strengthen your legs, build abs, and are cardio beneficial.

The movement requires total body strength to be able to lift your body weight off the floor. Thus, you burn more calories as several of your muscles are multi-tasking.

You can add it to your home workout routine as you do not need any gym equipment for its performance. You can sneak in some cardio while sculpting your abs from the comfort of your home.

There is really no excuse to skip work outs.

HOW TO DO SEATED KNEE TUCKS

Here is a step-by-step procedure of how to do the exercise:

  • Start in a seated position with your hands on the mat behind you and fingers facing forward.
  • Lean back with your back straight and fully extend your legs in front of you.
  • Now, lift your legs off the floor and bend them then draw your knees closer to the chest. Ensure to contract your abs as you do this.
  • Hold this position for a few seconds as you still squeeze your abs hard.
  • Slowly extend your legs fully back to the starting position without letting them touch the ground.
  • Repeat for the desired number of sets an reps.

SEATED KNEE TUCKS MUSCLES WORKED

RECTUS ABDOMINIS

Also known as abs for short, the rectus abdominis is the main muscle engaged. It is located on the front of your abdomen and it is what gives you the six-pack if you are lean enough.

Not only is it responsible for lateral flexion and flexion of your spine but also compression of the abdominal cavity.

Even though it is one muscle, there is a chance that you can optimally work one specific area of the muscle. With this in mind, the movement mainly emphasizes the “lower abs.”

During the movement, this muscle is a major stabilizer.

QUADS AND HAMSTRINGS

These muscles are responsible for flexing and extending your legs during the movement.

HIP FLEXOR MUSCLES

During the exercise, they support your hips throughout.

TRANSVERSE ABDOMINIS

This muscle is the deepest of your core and it encircles your waist like a weightlifting belt. It is activated when you brace your core to stabilize your mid-section by creating the intra-abdominal pressure.

 

OBLIQUES

Both the internal and external obliques are stabilizers during the exercise. They are the waist muscles.

They prevent unwanted movement like twisting and are responsible for rotation and lateral flexion of the spine.

SEATED KNEE TUCKS BENEFITS

BUILD CORE STRENGTH

Since abdominal muscles are the main targets, consistency in training them will help you strengthen your core.

Having a strong core comes in handy for almost all exercise. It helps you improve your performance for example in compound lifts.

Whether you are throwing a ball, lifting weights and heavy objects, or you simply want to get those six pack abs, the movement will help accomplish your goals.

WORK YOUR HIP FLEXORS AND CORE TOGETHER

Unlike most abs workout, the exercise does not work your core in isolation. They work both the core and hip flexors.

This makes them more functional  because in nature, the core works together with your hip flexors. Some of these activities include throwing, pushing, kicking, and punching.

IMPROVED POSTURE

Having a weak core, can cause slumped shoulders, an anterior pelvic tilt, and generally poor posture. This is because the core is responsible for supporting your spine and alignment of the body.

By strengthening your core, the movement can help you correct your posture and prevent low back pain.

IMPROVED AESTHETICS

If you are looking to develop sturdier and more defined abs, then this exercise will give you exactly that. The only catch is that you have to maintain the correct form.

SEATED KNEE TUCKS VARIATIONS AND VARIATIONS

WEIGHTED SEATED KNEE TUCKS

The weighted seated knee tucks are more advanced as they involve adding some weight to the standard seated knee tuck. Try balancing any weight above your ankles, then do the seated knee tucks.

SEATED KNEE TUCKS TO LEG CRUNCHES

The seated knee tucks to leg crunches are simply a combination of the two mentioned exercise. You need only alternate between them to form one movement.

HIP THRUSTS

For the hip thrusts you need to lie on your back with your knees slightly bent. Thrust your lower body upwards while bracing your abs.

Then slowly return to your initial position by relaxing your abs and hips. Keep your legs straight up and hips on the ground.

FLUTTER KICKS

Flutter kicks is a pretty easy move. With your hands by your side and legs raised straight up, lie on your back.

Lower one of your feet until it almost touches the ground. Now, raise this one as you lower the other.

Continue with the alternation ensuring your core is tightened throughout.

ALTERNATING KNEE INS

For the alternating knee ins, you will need to lie on your back with your raised legs straight out in front of you and head up off the floor. Draw one knee toward your chest while the other leg remains extended.

Keep your core engaged throughout. Now alternate with the other leg and repeat.

SEATED KNEE TUCKS MISTAKES TO AVOID

COMPLETING PARTIAL REPS

You should avoid doing half reps which means bringing your knees halfway back to the starting position. Ensure you fully extend your legs through out in order to completely stress your abs.

ROUNDING YOUR BACK

Do not round your back as it may unnecessarily strain the spine thus, risking lower back injury.  Remember the exercise heavily relies on stability.

Ensure to keep your back straight and your upper body stable. This will not only increase stress on your core, but also protect your body.

RUSHING THE MOTION

Do not rush the movement by speedily moving your upper body back and forth in order to extend your legs to and from.

This is because it shifts the tension from your core to your arms and back. Move your legs back and forth slowly so as to fully brace your core.

CONCLUSION

This easy exercise will improve your core appearance in no time. You only need to use the correct form and keep alternating with other core work outs.