How To Do Kneeling Landmine Press Properly

The kneeling landmine press is a chest dominant exercise that uses both hands to press an angled barbell.

Moreover, it is a unique overhead pressing movement that can help you build scapular strength and stability, and improve overall shoulder health and development.

Also, it is generally more comfortable, for people who experience shoulder pain, since its diagonal pressing path places less pressure on the elbow and shoulder joints.

Nevertheless, for a long time, overhead presses have been considered the ultimate shoulder exercise. Despite being quite challenging and sometimes painful, especially if you lack shoulder or spinal mobility. This is where the kneeling landmine press and its variations come in.

The latter movement puts you in a safer position as you do some overhead lifting since the bar is moving forward and away at an angle and not directly above your head.

Also, since the weight is fixed to an attachment, you can easily maintain control throughout the movement and safely build balance and strength.

The essence of kneeling is to eliminate the involvement of the legs, shifting even more strain onto the triceps and chest. The movement highly emphasis on muscle gain and is great for upper body isolation.

For the exercise, you will need a barbell set and weight plates.

HOW TO DO KNEELING LANDMINE PRESS

Here is a step-by-step procedure of doing the exercise:

  • Place a barbellinto either a landmine base or fix it in a corner of a wall.
  • Load weight plates to the end you’re going to grab.
  • Find an ab pad or anything comfortable to kneel on. Kneel on the ab pad and position your knees together.
  • Grab the top of the barbell with both hands and hold it in front of your chest.
  • Ensure you’re slightly leant forward and your core muscles are tightened.
  • Now, push the barbell up till your elbow is only slightly bent.
  • Pause at this point and contract your chest muscles.
  • Lower the barbell slowly back to your chest.
  • Repeat the movement for the desired number of sets and reps.

MUSCLES ENGAGED IN KNEELING LANDMINE PRESS

CHEST MUSCLES

The exercise is also called landmine chest press. This goes to show the chest muscles are the main muscles targeted.

SCAPULAR STABILIZERS

The movement forces you to press the weight from shoulder back position meaning your scapular stabilizers are engaged throughout the exercise.

Your scapulas or shoulder blades are the primary players in keeping your shoulder joint stable as they are what retract your shoulders.

TRICEPS

The triceps are involved during the final stages of elbow extension just like in most pressing movement. Even though they are not the primarily targeted muscle groups, they assist the shoulders in the lockout stage of the press.

SHOULDERS

The shoulder muscles or deltoids are the primary driver of this movement.

CORE MUSCLES

Engaging the core is important to maintain stability.

KNEELING LANDMINE PRESS BENEFITS

SCAPULAR CONTROL

The movement improves proper scapular control and stabilization because of the pressing angle and loading of the barbell as it comes into an out of the body.

This scapular stability and control is essential for athletes placing loads overhead.

MORE PRESSING STRENGTH

Since the movement builds scapular stability and shoulder strength, it makes hoisting large objects overhead easy.

UPPER-BODY STRENGTH

Incorporating this movement in your workout regimen, will challenge your shoulders, chest, triceps and abs muscles such that it will help perfect your push-ups. Therefore, this exercise is a great builder of upper-body strength.

SHOULDER SAFETY

As discussed above, unlike overhead presses, the movement puts less stress on the shoulder joints. Also, it requires less mobility through the shoulders and spine to perform with proper form.

Actually, landmine variations are great for protecting the joints unlike overhead presses which are known for causing both acute and wear-and-tear injuries when performed without perfect form.

CORE STABILITY

Your core muscles are engaged to keep your body stable throughout the movement. This strengthens it firing it up more and more as you progress.

KNEELING LANDMINE PRESS VARIATIONS

BANDED LANDMINE PRESS

For the banded landmine press, you need to get into standing landmine press position, place a looped resistance band under your feet and loop the other end around the shaft of your barbell.

This band creates tension throughout the movement. You do not need any weight for this but you can add some weight plates once you get used to the band.

STANDING LANDMINE PRESS

The standing landmine press demands greater body control and allows you to use the lower body for stability at a greater extent. Thus, you can press heavier loads

KNEELING LANDMINE PRESS ALTERNATIVES

OVERHEAD PRESS

The overhead press is greatly beneficial to strength, power, and fitness athletes. Here, you can use either a barbell, dumbbell, or axle bar to increase strength or change movement patterning. It is common in fitness competitions.

Z PRESS

The Z Press helps improve your overhead strength, shoulder and triceps mass, and promote proper overhead positioning. However, since you do not involve your legs, you won’t be able to lift as heavy.

KNEELING LANDMINE PRESS MISTAKES TO AVOID

LEANING INTO THE PRESS

Unlike the standard landmine press, this is a chest exercise and not majorly a shoulder one. Therefore, you want to keep your upper body at the same angle as you press and not lean into the press.

ARCHING THE LOWER BACK

Arching your back as you press, changes the angle of your body and this takes the tension off of the chest and shoulder muscles. This places unnecessary strain on your lower back. Keeping your ab and glute muscles engaged throughout the movement solves this.

GOING TOO HEAVY

You do not need to go heavy with this movement as it may cause you to arch your back or lean into the press.

UNEVEN GRIP

Ensure your hands ae locked together.

CONCLUSION

The kneeling landmine press is a better option for strengthening your upper pecs. This is if you have trouble with overhead presses or just want to avoid potential shoulder issues in the future.